9/15/05

EL MONTE CAMPS

~EL MONTE RIFA~

EL MONTE - THE WORD IS HISPANIC IN ORIGIN, BUT WHAT WAS IT'S ORIGINAL MEANING?

MOST ASSUME IT MUST PERTAIN TO A HILL OR A MOUNTAIN OF SOME SORT, BUT EL MONTE AS A PLACE HAS NO HILLS OR MOUNTAINS WITH THE EXCEPTION OF THE DISTANT SAN GABRIELS.
IN THE 1770'S SPANISH SOLDIERS AND MISSIONARIES EXPLORED AN ISLAND BETWEEN TWO RIVERS, RICH IN SOIL, LOW-LYING, COVERED WITH DENSE GROWTHS OF SLENDER WILLOWS, ALDERS AND CATTAILS. THIS ISLAND PARADISE WAS BEST DESCRIBED BY THE SPANIARDS AS THE WOODED SPOT, MARSH, AND MEADOWS ALL IN ONE - THE CARACTERISTICS WERE CLEAR - WATER, WOOD (FUEL), AND SOIL, ALL THAT IS ASSOCIATED AS A PLACE DEFINED BY THOSE WITH A MASTERY OF THE SPANISH LANGUAGE TO BE DESCRIPTIVE OF "EL MONTE". NOT A HILL OR A MOUNTAIN BUT A BOUNTIFUL PLACE IN THE WILD.

THE RIVER TO THE EAST AND NORTH EAST WAS CHRISTENED "SAN GABRIEL" AND THE RIVER TO THE NORTH AND WEST WAS CHRISTENED THE "RIO HONDO".

EL MONTE PROSPERED AND GREW DURING THE ERA OF THE SPANISH MISSIONS (1770'S to 1830'S), THEN LATER UNDER THE LAND GRANT RANCHOS.

IN 1826 SMALL GROUPS OF AMERICANS COMING INTO THE AREA, REFERRED TO THE REST AND REHABILITATION AFFORDED HERE AS "CAMP MONTE" OR "MONTE CAMP", HENCE THE CAMP ERA BEGAN.
SOME OF THESE NEW ARRIVALS CHRISTENED THE RESPECTIVE AREAS WHERE THEY DWELT WITH NAMES SUCH AS "HICKS" AND "WIGGINS" IN REFERENCE TO THE NEW TENANTS OCCUPYING SOME OF THE LANDS.

WITH THE ADVENT OF THE 20th CENTURY, EL MONTE CONTINUED TO GROW AND PROSPER. ONE COMMERCIAL SEED COMPANY LEASED FERTILE TRACTS OF LAND IN THE SOUTHERN PART OF THE ISLAND AND GREW BREATHTAKING PLOTS OF FLOWERING PLANTS. THIS AREA BEGAN TO BE REFERRED BY THE FARMERS AS "LAS FLORES" A NAME WHICH PERSIST TODAY AS "EL MONTE FLORES"

EL MONTE CONTINUED TO GROW DURING THE EARLY PART OF THE CENTURY LARGELY IN PART DUE TO "LA REVOLUCION MEXICANA" (1910 to 1920). MANY OF EL MONTE BARRIOS TOOK SHAPE WITH THE MASS MIGRATION OF THOSE HOPE-FILLED MASSED WHOM FLED THE VIOLENCE IN MEXICO.

OTHERS MOVED IN FROM AREAS OF LOS ANGELES, LIKE THEY DID FROM BOYLE HEIGHTS, AN AREA KNOWN AS "THE FLATS" (OLD RUSSIA TOWN FLATS) WERE THEY FACED STIFF SEGREGATION FOR THEIR CHILDREN IN THE AVAILABLE SCHOOLS.

DURING THE 1930'S THE GREAT DEPRESSION BROUGHT DOLDRUMS TO EL MONTE JUST AS IT DID EVERYWHERE ELSE.
EL MONTE BEGAN TO CHANGE RAPIDLY FROM A "LIL FARM TOWN" TO A GROWING "BEDROOM COMMUNITY" WHERE PEOPLE LIVED BUT WORKED AND COMMUTED ELSEWHERE.

BY THE LATE 40'S AND 50'S THE CAMPS OF EL MONTE BEGAN TO BE BROKEN UP BETWEEN THE DIFFERENT CITIES AND COMMUNITIES TAKING SHAPE THROUGHOUT THE SAN GABRIEL VALLEY.

FOLLOWING THE BUILDING BOOM OF THE 40'S AND 50'S, THE POPULATION EXPLODED AND IN 1958 A SECOND COMMUNITY OF EL MONTE WAS INCORPORATED AS "SOUTH EL MONTE" THIS COMPROMISED THE SOUTHWEST PART OF THE ONCE "WOODED ISLAND".

THE OLD EL MONTE NEIGHBORHOODS KNOWNS AS CAMPS WERE THE FOLLOWING

1 - LA MISION (SAN GABRIEL MISION AREA)
2 - LA COLONIA (LA SECCION)
3 - CANTA RANAS (WHITTIER NARROWS)
4 - CHINO CAMP (LA PUENTE)
5 - HICKS CAMP (FIVE POINTS)
6 - LA GRANADA
7 - LAS FLORES (EL MONTE)
8 - WIGGINS CAMP
9 - CAMP HAYES (MEDINA COURTS)

Along Valley Blvd is where the original Mexican migrants fleeing the Mexican Revolution of 1920 settled along, mainly in the two Camps of WIGGINS' and HICKS', then by the late 1920's a new Camp was formed - Camp HAYES which later became known as MEDINA COURT.

Originally CANTA RANAS was in an area around the Whittier Narrows Dam, but after the flood projects works began around the late 1940's/early 50's (because the area was flooded during the rainy season), many families moved out to adjoining areas, and today you find Varrio Canta Ranas in the city of Santa Fe Springs further down the river.



EL MONTE BARRIOS
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
EMF - EL MONTE FLORES - Rowland Street
=CAMP LAS FLORES

EMH - EL MONTE HICKS - Locos, Hickory Boys
=CAMP HICKS/FIVE POINTS

EMHS - EL MONTE HAYES - The Courts, TLS Tiny Locos
=CAMP HAYES/MEDINA COURTS

NSM - NORTH SIDE MONTES

NS EM - NORTH SIDE EL MONTE

SS EM - SOUTH SIDE EL MONTE

EL MONTE LIGA / LEGION

EMR - EL MONTE RIFA – Dukes

SSTM - SASTRE STREET MONTE

Note: I am still looking for more history and info on the camps and barrios of El Monte, so if any of you have some to share & help me out with, "It would be greatly appreciated".

18 comments:

curious suburbanite said...

Lonewolf -

Your writing is skilled and your grasp of history is impressive. If possible could you (or someone) post some info/research on Whittier-area gangs such as Jimtown, Sunrise, etc.

Much respect

Anonymous said...

From Lonewolf to Anonymous.

Re; Whittier Varrios

I don't have too much historia as yet for Jim Town Hoyo & Loma, nor SunRise, Quiet village, HorseShoe or others, but I'm always trying to hit up people and collect history of Los Varrios. you're welcome to put up you question on the BK Forum, just click on the link already made available on my blog-site and it will take you straight to it.

Al Rato ESE.

Anonymous said...

Is there anything that you know about Lomas?

jimbo said...

i have always wunderd if anyone knew the history of the gangs in the aria. so who came first hicks of flores, and do you know of any history on F13 i would really love to know

El Gabby El Monte Hayes La Medina Court said...

A little insight into mi barrio, soy de El Monte Hayes mis abuelitos immigrated here from Mexico in the early 1920’s first they took up residence in what is now La Puente, then later moved to El Monte in what is presently Medina court (Hayes)Where my jefita was born in 1928. Hicks camp is a little bit older then Hayes, but the actual street Medina court was estabished in 1907, to which I've seen documents. Back then the “camps” were actually ranchos that adopted the names of the ranch owners. e.g. “de donde eres? El rancho de Hayes or el rancho de Hicks”. Many familys from Hicks and Hayes were related through marriges, my jefita was from Hayes and my jefe was from Hicks although he was born in Mexico.

John Hayes:
A successful farmer, teacher and walnut grower, who pioneered with the early settlers of El Monte, and vicinity, was John Hayes. Born in Ireland in 1836, Mr. Hayes came to America and California in 1868 from Australia, where for a number of years, he had served the British government as a surveyor. For a number of years, immediately following his arrival in California, Mr. Hayes was likewise employed by the Southern Pacific Railway as a surveyor.
In 1878 he came to El Monte and engaged in teaching – his services being used in the El Monte, Bogdale (now Temple), and Lower Azusa Schools. In the year of his arrival in El Monte Mr. Hayes was married to Susan Hubbert, who came to California from Texas about the year 1868. Six boys were born to this union, of whom five are now living (1936), namely: W.T. of New York city, B.H. and Eugene, of Madera, California, and Frank and E.A. of El Monte.Mr. Hayes purchased a ranch of 300 acres north and east of El Monte, and for a number of years, engaged in raising grain and hogs. He later was one of the first to see the possibilities of what was later to be one of this district’s major industries – walnut raising.
His sons, Frank and E.A. now own the original ranch fo their father and have operated it since his death, which occurred in 1910. Mrs. Hayes died in 1917. Worth of note is the historical fact that John Hayes, together with Scott Killian, another large ranch owner of that time, purchased and installed the first irrigating pumping plant, in the El Monte district, which marked the beginning of irrigation by pumping, and led to further development in agriculture in this territory.Frank Hayes, one of the sons, is and for several years has been, manager of the El Monte Walnut Growers’ Association.

My abuelito and a few other veteranos from Medina court actually worked for Mr. Hayes on his rancho. It was told to me by an old timer that he was a miserly man and did not treat our people fair.



El Monte in the 1920's was an agricultural area known for its crops of walnuts, strawberries and tomatoes. Most of these crops were planted and harvested by migrant workers. The city's economy was also made up of canneries and small businesses located along Valley Boulevard, in addition to the agricultural industry.
The migrant workers used by the farmers immigrated to the United States from Mexico following the Mexican Revolution of 1910. The immigrants coming to El Monte settled in two camps known as Wiggins and Hicks Camp. In the late 1920's and early 1930's, a new colony started. It was first called Hayes after the man who owned the land but later it became known as Medina Court. It is here where El Calvario is presently located.The camps where the Mexicans lived had inadequate housing, no electricit and unsanitary conditions. It was these conditions which brought forth the visitation of some members of the Divine Savior Presbyterian Church of Los Angeles, who made weekly visits to Hicks Camp. This effort to help the workers in Hicks Camp began in 1927 but became organized in 1929 under the name of the Mexican-American Board.By 1942 the Mexican-American Board had a deep concern for the spiritual and social conditions of all the Mexican residents of the city of El Monte. Prompted by this vital interest in their living conditions, a survey was conducted. And it was not until this survey that it became apparent that a social approach with a strong Christian motivation was necessary to bring about social changes in a community lacking so much. A more systematic approach was planned. In 1949 a new Board of Directors was constituted and a budget of $4,845.00 was approved to develop a social work program in the area.
A Pastor-Director, Mr. Trujillo, was then hired and an old two story building in Medina Court was acquired. The name "Mexican American Board" was dropped and a new name, El Calvario Community Center, was adopted. In September 1949, a group worker, Dorothy King, was hired to help augment the program. Although the main building for the Center was located in Medina Court, Hicks Camp was served on an outstation basis until the land was sold and developed into single family homes.
Andy Torres followed Mr. Trujillo as Director and Almaron Wilder was hired when Mr. Torres resigned. It was during Mr. Wilder's term as Director that the Synod of Southern California constructed the building in Medina Court where El Calvario is presently located. A playing field in back of the building was acquired by the Board of Directors in 1960.
In 1958, the Board engaged Ignacio Aquilar as Director and he played a vital role in the development and direction of the Center until his resignation in October 1977. Sachi Asahina joined the staff in 1965 as ProgramDirector and was appointed Acting Director in 1977. Sachi also played an important part in shaping the programs at the Center, and it was under her direction that a nursery school was started. Since its inception, the nursery school has consistently been one of the most successful programs at El Calvario.
In 1970, El Calvario incorporated as a non-profit agency. In 1971, the contribution of $15,000.00 year by the Synod of Southern California was drastically curtailed and the following year was withdrawn. After that, El Calvario funded itself through the United Way, private contributions and gifts of various organizations and individual churches, although the building continued to be owned by the Synod of Southern California.
In 1978, Arturo Guevara, our present Executive Director, was hired by the Board of Directors. 1978 also marked the refunding of El Calvario by the Synod of Southern California, although to a lesser degree than formerly. By mid-1981, the staff had grown to include three full-time employees and four part-time workers, making a greatly expanded program possible. However, as throughout its history, the motivation has continued to be a Christian concern for the health and welfare of the constituency El Calvario serves.


El Calvario Community Center still stands today at its present location on Montecito Drive, a block south of Medina Court. The center has seen better days. Today there is still a nursery school a boxing program, and few other programs for at risk youths. As far as all the original families from the early days, Ramirez’s, Saenz, Beltrans, Guardados, Granados, flores, well most are gone. A lot of new people from Mexico live in the area but it is know longer a Barrio like it used to be when everyone knew one another.

Anonymous said...

dave-


I would like to know more about "Las Flores" camp and how the gang got started.

MR.PALO said...

I have a friend that used to be from La Valle (RGV) aqui in Tejas before he moved here to Houstone.He used to talk about some of the varrios down there in the valley.He said there was a Varrio Horseshoe down there and La Paloma just to name a few.I wonder if there was any connection in the past to those Varrios and the ones that are over there in Califas?

Anonymous said...

La Mision I'm assuming refers to the present day city of San Gabriel and the barrio of Sangra. Is this the case, and if so was San Gabriel once a part of El Monte before it became it's own city. I grew up in the area and unfortunately the history is not well represented and told.

Thanks

Anonymous said...

The original Mission was located in what is now South El Monte, somewhere in between Santa Anita Ave. and Rosemead Blvd. (Marrano beach) back in the days, that area would flood durring the rainy season, so the Mission was moved to its present location in San Gabriel.

EL GABBY EL MONTE HAYES MEDINA CT.

Anonymous said...

i dont remember much of hicks but i was there when i was 4 or 5 with my other bros and sis my brother was the first to join to go to war from there i did have a pic but dang if i can fine it i wanted to go put it up, and i do remember father john, i remember him hoking the horn and all the kids jump in his car and we would all go to the show or the pool, and also the cops didnt want to go in there at that time, i heard a scream one nite the next day one had got stabed, sorry about the bad spelling lol,
got to go for now but will be back.

Anonymous said...

my name is SOLO soy del MONTE HAYES tls[clika] I lived in Monte since i was born,my jefito[victor rico]said my fist home as a infant was on schmith st off tyler ave.I moved to medina ct in 1981,I remember growin up watching tatted down cholos up and down the courts.since my tia[MARIA]lived rigth on the couner of pine and medina we watch everything.growin up in el monte was quite an expirience,always getting hit up by manfloras,as a matter fact my own primos becase jefas side was all flores.In 1989 i got jumped in the varrio,yea my family was petty upset but now they got over it.All my dad's familia is from mexico and most of them always lived in el monte.now i reside in texas whit my kids,but i never forget EL MONTE HAYES.i keep serching for more and more history of my varrio.AL RATO.

Anonymous said...

VARRIO EL MONTE HAYES TINY LOCOS MEDINA ct.(somos)FLACO-PEANUT-SOLO-lilRHINO-CRICKET-NIPPY-TERMITE-PUPPET-lilWOLFIE-MORENO-SPOOKY-PAYASO-SPANKY-lilHOSS-STONER-GRANDE-MATON-CASPER-TOPPER-VAGO-lilTURTTLE-DROWSY-SHAGGY-GIGGLER-SNEEKY-SLEEPY-WERO-DUKE-KILLER-CYCO-BANDIT-BLEENKY-TRUSTY-lilMAN-SNOOPY-DRAGON-DANNYBOY-lilSMILEY.RIP(tls homies much love)DREAMER-lilINDIO-SUGAR BEAR (this were the crazy 90's)

Anonymous said...

BIG QVO TO MY PERRO ESE MR GABBY DE EL MONTE HAYES X111 SIMON HOMIE REMEMBER THEM 70´S BACK EN LA TORCIDA ,NOW THOSE WAS THE DAYS NOT LIKE NOW. AHORA VALE MADRE TODO ESTOS MORROS NO SABEN NADA AN THE REASON IS THEY GOT NO OLD SCHOOL HOMIES ON THE CALLES TO SHOW THEM THE RIGHTOUS WAY Y RUN THEM DOWN LAS MOVIDAS WACHA ITS ONE THING TO REPRESENT TU VARRIO ON HERE SIMON ITS ALL GOOD BUT THESE CHAVALONES COME CLEAR OUT LEFT FIELD DISRESPECTING AN YOU KNOW WHAT THE TRIPIASO IS QUE ONCE THEY HIT LA TORCIDA TODO LOS VARRIOS DE SFV,SGV,LOS,IE,OxC PURO SUR!ALL KICK IT TOGETHER DEPENDS ON WHAT AREA YOU FROM SIMON EVEN CELL UP WITH YOUR VARRIOS ENEMYS AN COME OUT ROADDOGS ,BUT THEN THATS A THING THEY WILL LEARN QUE NO , PUES TE WACHO HOMIE YA SABES JUST SEEN YOUR PLAQUIASO ON HERE AN WANTED TO GIVE MY REGARDS CON RESPETO EL SANFERRO the homie con las rolas chowwwww....ANYONE OUT THERE RUN INTO THE HOMIES JOEY FX3 DB´S,LIL ERNIE MMV,CAPONE SAN DIEGO,IGOR CLANTON,MONK HG,BIG QVOS Y SIMON LONEWOLF FIRME TU JALE KEEP UP THE GOOD INTENTION, ESE U ERE

Anonymous said...

Thats right homeboy educate these fus the hood has seen better days but we still have a hartbeat no thanks to the cops. where not done yet though viva los el monte HayeS 13 gang pocos beto locos fk all day Dozer Hs 13 dukes click. HayeS love

Anonymous said...

It puro monte hayes 13 all day everyday till the day we die & still
in paradise El Monte Hayes will still remain I miss you homeboy ..love u your Homegirl U know the queen

Cristina Morales said...

Hayes love what's up homie can't forget us the ones who put it down in the 90"s LAS TINY LOCAS Og La Looney.Payasa R.I.P Chola.Bambi.Mousie.Flaca.Sadgirl.Sola just a few of us locas

Anonymous said...

Does anyone from Hayes ever grow up?

Anonymous said...

Gang got started when mexicans started selling flowers by the freeways. Hence the name "Flores." Till this day these people cant get real jobs