12/19/07

IN MEMORY OF THE BARRIO

ONCE UPON A TIME THERE WAS A BARRIO

RIGHT THERE IN HOLLOWED GROUNDS

IN THOSE SACRED GROUNDS

BEYOND THE WHITE CITY LIMITS

PRACTICING A SLOWER LIFESTYLE

TRADITIONS FROM AN ANCIENT CULTURE

TIME HONORED TRADITIONS

IN A SMALL SETTLEMENT

WITH DIRT STREETS AND ALLEYS

SOON IT PASSED INTO HISTORY

PAVED OVER AND WASHED AWAY

BY SOME MEAN POWERFUL FORCES AT WORK

IN A LUCRATIVE LAND GRAB SCHEME JACK OF TRADES

CONSTRUCTING THE NEW MEGA CITY

TURNED THE BARRIO INTO A NEW CONCRETE CITY

ONCE A GRAND VILLAGE

WHICH ENDURED TIME EVERLAST

BUT WITH EVERY PASSING YEAR

THE OLD ADOBES WERE DONE AWAY

THE NEW WAS BUILT ATOP THE OLD

AND TODAY ONLY A HANDFUL OF BARRIOS REMAIN

. . .

A PAST BURIED

THE DANGER ZONES IS ALL THAT REMAINS

FILLED WITH CHAMUCOS AND DIABLOS

THOSE FROM THE LOST GENERATION

THE REASSEMBLED SOULS

RELICS OF THE PAST

THE DINASTY WHICH REMAINS

A CITY FILLED WITH GHOSTS

GHOSTS OF AN ENIGMATIC PEOPLE

GHOST OF THE MANY FALLEN ONES

GHOSTS AND ENIGMAS CARRYING ON

MIXED IN WITH THE NEW

WITH SO MUCH OLD THINGS TO SAVE

BUT WITH SO LIL’ TIME LEFT

12/2/07

MI VARRIO RIFA

“RIFA”

Not an easy verb to translate and put into English form.

From age old Rifa has been incorporated into the Chicano Varrio structure . .

Used in both graffiti and street jargon . .

For many Varrios it is an integral part of their name . .

And for most others Rifa becomes of optional use . .

El Sereno Rifa, Varrio Alpine Rifa, East LA Rifa, Barrio Elmwood Rifa . .

Those are just a but a few of the Varrios in which Rifa
is an integral part of their “official name” . .

In essence “all Varrios” can add Rifa to their placasos . .

Much in the same way that all Varrios can opt to add and use the
V/B for Varrio/Barrio . .

But only a handful officially incorporate Rifa into their official name.

What does Rifa mean?

Where does it come from?

Why is it used by all Varrios?

Where it comes from is easy . .

It comes from the Spanish language . .

It is not a Calo slang word . .

And it was not invented by Chicanos.

It was adopted by the Chicano world . .

And incorporated into it’s gang jargon . .

But it was already in use by the average Mexican . .

In particular when a physical dispute was involved . .

And that is because Rifa comes from the verb “RIFAR” . .

RIFAR means “to quarrel” and “to fight” . .

In Mexicanisms . .

A vato can say for instance “YO ME LA RIFO”

Which loosely translates as . .

“I’LL DARE TO” or “I’LL GET DOWN” . .

With the added implication of being down for
anything or against anyone, anytime and any place!

The same application can be said of its plural form . .

“SE LA RIFAN” or “RIFAN” (Roll the dice & Fuck 1t!) . .

Or as some in the Chicano world are most familiar with
~> “RIFAMOS” . .

To which the addition of ~> “CONTROLAMOS” makes it . .
~> in a sense “complete”.

=RIFAMOS Y CONTROLAMOS=

~> We’re in the mix . .

~> We’re down for anything . .

~> We roll the dice . .

~> We don’t give a fuck . .

~> And we control!

Why the “roll the dice?

Because Rifa also means “Raffle” . .

But Raffle in the underworld form application of . .
~> not knowing the outcome but takes the risk and plays!

A gamble . .

A Russian roulette you might say.

Roll the bullet chamber and pull the trigger . .

CRAZEE!!!

All the above mentioned and the like . .

All which plays a part in the Chicano world . .

. . is what gives Rifa its “universal meaning” . .

Therefore everyone can claim it . .

Not just A Varrio . . But all the Varrios . .

Not just An Individual . . But all the Individuals!

Rifa can be plural or singular . .

It can be used in the context of the Varrio . .

Or it can be used in the context of an individual(s) Life . .

Hence the reason why you can see it written . .

Next to or under a Varrio’s name/initials . .

Or under an individual(s) name who may or may not
~> claim a Varrio.

For it is “not” exclusive to the gang world!

Rifa is used with or without affiliation or reference
to the street gang world “anywhere!

This is something that has become somewhat lost in the
Chicano world . .

But one that “still” lives on in the Mexican Side.

In the Chicano world Rifa lost some of its original meaning . .

And morphed into the present times understanding . .

And application of “RULES” ~> as in governs!

An erroneous concept which got crossed with the other . .

Oldenly used but long lost . .

“RIGE” or “RIJA” . .

From the Spanish “REGLA” . .

To Rule and “To Manage” . .

“REGIR”

“To Control” and “To be out in force”

“REGIRSE”

“To go by” and “Be guided by”

Rules and Regulations per say!

An indication of how the Varrio was to live by . .

~> and by extension its membership!

Even to this day . .

Some Homeboys can still be heard making mention of . .

“REGLAS” or “RIJAS” in reference to the . .

“unwritten rules” that govern the Varrio and The Life!

Regla (Rules) or Rije (Governs) in essence was substituted by Rifa . .

And Rifa now carries the same applications of Rules and Governs!

And so it is understood today by the many . .

Nevertheless . .

Rifa original meaning in the Varrio and prior history . .

~> is non-other than “RUMBLE” !!!

DOG TOWN RUMBLES!

HAPPY VALLEY RUMBLES!

BIG HAZARD RUMBLES!

FROG TOWN RUMBLES!

LIL VALLEY RUMBLES!

WHITE FENCE RUMBLES!

They’re in the mix!

They roll the dice and play!

They’re down for anything!

They don’t give a fuck!

Exclamation at the end . .

Same exclamation you used to see in many placasos . .

Right next to a Varrios initials . .

Same one that goes unnoticed by many today . .

The same exclamation which served as decoration and shaded . .

But one that gave insight to the . .

~> “WAR POWERS” of “RIFA!

MI VARRIO RIFA Y QUE?

MY HOOD IS DOWN FOR IT AND WHAT OF?

RIFAMOS Y CONTROLAMOS!

WE RULE AND WE CONTROL!

= MI VARRIO RIFA =
"MY NEIGHBORHOOD IS WORTH IT"

9/4/07

"MADRE"

“MADRE”

One of the most used terms in Chicano Folklore . . .

Madre = Mother

Can’t get no simpler than that on my block!

But “MADRE” is indeed more complicated than simple . . .

Tu Puta Madre

Ni Madres

Poca Madre

A Toda Madre

Esta Madre

Rajale la Madre

Partele la Madre

No Tiene Madre

Mentale la Madre

Vales Pa’ Pura Madre

Me Cai de A Madres

El Puro Des’Madre

Dale en La Madre

Aguanta Una Madre

Se Rajo La Madre

Se Dio en Toda su Madre

Madrealo al Guey

Dale en La Madre

Ponle Una Madriza

Se Echo Una Madrecita

Se fue echo a La Madre

Calma esa Madre

Chinga Tu Madre

Or if you prefer

Chingas a toda tu pinche Madre

A TODA MADRE O EL PURO DESMADRE!

8/29/07

ECONOMICS and the VARRIO

In the low-income barrios, residents feel that the police are a repressive force as much as a protective one. Young male residents are stopped and searched on East LA’s streets-often, they say, while just “minding our own business.” While police searched residents, cars and pedestrians were held up behind their squad car roadblocks. At night, sleepers were awakened by the noise of police helicopters passing only five hundred feet overhead or by the light of the “midnight sun” searchlight that police used to track suspects. Older barrio residents complained that police were “never around when you need them” and were slow to arrive when called. Artists painted murals throughout East LA that celebrated the memories of young residents killed by police bullets during “legal interventions.” AS much as any event of everyday life, these well-remembered killings lent police forces the air of outside occupiers rather than community protectors.East LA street gangs are a visible opponent of police, and residents who feel oppressed by police often have sympathy for the gangs. Residents embraced a range of positions in ongoing police-gang conflict. Gang support range from active assistance to reluctant sympathy; some residents curse gangs and police equally; and still others wished the police would sweep the gangs out of the barrios. This variety of orientations reflects the multifaceted relationship between gang and community. Residents object to police brutality, but they also oppose gang-associated violence. Residents want safe streets and a law-abiding citizenry, but history taught them—and daily life reminded them—that unconstrained police officers could be both disruptive and dangerous. The relationship between gang and community differed from barrio to barrio and from time to time. In 1995, for example, inter-gang violence in East LA’s Pico Aliso Housing Projects killed four young people in less than two weeks. In these circumstances, one young resident’s opinion of the local gangs was typical. “Every night they (members of rival gangs) get drunk and start shooting. Bam bam bam. I hear them outside my apartment all night long. I get up in the morning and there are bullet holes in the outside wall. I hate them.” Pico Aliso residents welcomed police intervention to quell the violence. On the other hand, in another barrio near Boyle Heights, a community activist sought to end the tagging of neighborhood residences. Local gang members thought the activist too aggressive, and their viewpoint gained support from the community. Over the course of two months, negotiations between the local organization heading the anti-tagging campaign and the gang became increasingly tense. Finally the gang forced the activist to abandon the anti-tagging campaign and resign from the organization, and a gang leader assumed the vacant position on the organization’s board.

Estrada Courts barrio had only one gang, or varrio, Varrio Nuevo Estrada. The VNE varrio traces its history back to the 1930s, when Mexican-Americans first began settling in the private homes around Hunter Street that would later be torn down to construct the Estrada Courts housing project. After the housing projects were built, the Hunter Street gang re-established itself in the development. In 1995, VNE was peaceful compared to Pico Aliso because VNE had firm control over the projects. Raquel, a lifelong resident in her early forties, expressed the gratitude that many resident felt when she said, “One thing about Estrada that is good is that there is only one gang here. That means we don’t have the problems, like they do at Aliso, where the projects are cut up into so many different little territories. Over there, there is fighting all the time and violence is a big problem.”In the 1990s, VNE had extended its control to “natural” social borders in the greater East LA by establishing itself in two neighborhoods, the housing projects themselves, and in near-by private housing just beyond East LA proper. VNE members even established affiliated sub-gangs in distant communities. VNE members attributed the gang’s strength to its political stability-- (their historic rival gang in East LA, several residents said, was paralyzed by leadership quarrels) --and to a positive relationship with the Estrada Courts community.

The presence of VNE in the Estrada Courts community had both positive and negative effects on illicit economic activity. The presence of Varrio members and affiliates on the sidewalks of the community at nearly all times of the day and night discouraged some kinds of illicit economic activities in the neighborhood. Residents “hanging out” noted who entered the projects in cars and confronted strangers passing through on foot. Their presence created lively and populated streets that reduced opportunities for street crime. Their preeminence in public meant that many people strongly identified VNE the Varrio with Estrada Courts the Barrio. By maintaining a public presence on the streets of the projects, the VNE Varrio presented the whole community to the outside world.The strong identification between VNE the Varrio and Estrada Courts the Barrio facilitated illicit work by interfering with law enforcement efforts of suppressing illicit activities in the projects. The entrance of the police into the projects was announced by warning shouts from residents hanging out on the sidewalks, and news of police arrival often spread through the projects more quickly than the police themselves were able to drive from one side of the development to the other. Sometimes these warnings came from illicit workers, gang members, or gang affiliates who had specific reason to fear police presence. But as frequently “civilians”—Estrada Courts residents neither of VNE membership nor involvement in illicit activities—issued warnings.Advance notice was particularly valuable for residents selling illicit drugs. Gator an VNE member who made most of his income selling drugs on the streets of Estrada Courts. Like the other drug sellers, Gator was most vulnerable to arrest when he actually had drugs in his possession. So Gator maintained stashes near the hot spot. When he heard warning shouts, Gator would put whatever he was holding in a hollow spot near the base of a small tree or he would jump onto the handrail of a nearby unit’s stoop and jam the drugs into a rain gutter. Anyone on the streets could see where Gator had stashed the drugs, so he had to keep an eye out for “thieves”. At the same time, hiding places could not be too obvious, as police often raked nearby bushes or turned over garbage cans looking for stashes.

The relationship between illicit work and the varrio is also affected by the social capital conferred by gang membership. This social capital both constrains and facilitates activities in the illicit economy. Membership is a liability because police often focuses on residents dressed in the distinctive varrio style—young people in baggy pants and carefully selected sneakers who display tattoos and hand signals; young men with shaved heads; and smaller number of young women who carefully plucked their eyebrows and applied makeup in distinctive styles—when they patrolled the projects. Looking like a gang member is an important component of varrio membership. Residents who are merely affiliated with a gang often dress in the varrio style, and street wise residents of East LA pride themselves on their ability to distinguish the “wannabe” poser from the legitimate “original gangster.” On the other hand, as one VNE member complained, “the cops hassle us just because we wear baggy pants and we’re baldy. Half the time we’re not even doing anything when they rack us up.” Police also focus on Barrio “civilians” who dress in the fashionable “baldy” style. For example, Chaco was an eighteen-year-old Estrada courts resident who was not affiliated with VNE but did dress in the “baldy” style. He was hanging out with friends one afternoon when CRASH came into the projects. He was searched and questioned and, a half hour later, cited for drinking in public. Chaco, who was unemployed, considered the $100 citation a disaster. “There’s no way I can pay that, and there’s no way I’m going to go to court and get put in jail for a couple days. They’re going to put a warrant out on me. I guess the next time I get picked up, they’re going to arrest me.”Gang membership also facilitates illicit work-especially for residents engaged in the relatively sophisticated activities of illicit enterprises. Older VNE members teach younger members the skills needed to participate in these enterprises. For example Ronny, a twenty-four-year-old Estrada courts resident, learned how to steal cars from going on “missions” with older VNE members soon after he became active in VNE at age thirteen. Older members of the gang taught him which cars were valuable to steal, how to enter and start up a car, what to do if problems arose during the commission of theft. His first theft, Ronny said, were mostly just for joyriding. He remembered the horrible day he broke into his father’s car and ended up steering it into a telephone pole, and he recalled with bravado the day he and three homeboys in a hot car successfully eluded the police in a wild circuit through alleyways, lawns, and playing fields of Boyle Heights. But with time, Ronny began to steal cars for economic reasons. At that time, gang membership again proved valuable. Through members, Ronny was introduced to a mechanic at a nearby garage who bought stolen cars and parts. By his late teens, Ronny said he had become a confident and competent car thief. At times, he patrolled parking lots and residential streets not far from the projects looking for attractive cars to steal, and at other times he filled orders for particular parts or cars from the garage mechanic.VNE provided the social support needed for illicit enterprises. Following a drive-by shooting late one afternoon, Berto, a twenty-six-year-old VNE member, explained the techniques involved:“There are a couple of different kinds of drive-bys. Some of them, like the one today, are pretty disorganized. They just had one car come in. They just grabbed a car and came at us . . . A more organized one, you get two cars and you get a whole bunch of homeboys in the front one. They come in and they get all the attention. Everyone’s worried about that car because they can see all the homeboys. But the second car is the one with the shooter . . . Sometimes, they’d have a kid do the shooting so that if they got caught it wouldn’t be as bad.”

Supporting illicit activities need not be offered up voluntarily. Berto’s own experience with drive-by shootings provide an example of how VNE members could be coerced into participating as crime partners in illicit activities. “The first one I was in, I was terrified,” he recalled, “I was fifteen or sixteen years old, and they wanted me to do the shooting. I didn’t want to do it, but the older homeboys put a lot of pressure on me, and finally I did it. They really didn’t give me a choice.” Unaffiliated residents could be compelled to provide social support for illicit activities as well. When VNE members became convinced that the adolescent boy in one family had provided police with information about a recent robbery, they retaliated against him and his family. After receiving threats, the boy and his family hastily left their residence and moved in with relatives who lived some distance away. Their apartment was broken into, its contents burned, and its walls emblazoned with VNE tags. Many residents understood the burnt-out-apartment-soon boarded up by housing authority officials-as a reminder of what VNE could do to defend itself against threats from within the community.

A final way in which the social capital of Varrio membership facilitates illicit activities is by mitigating the consequences of police apprehension and imprisonment. VNE is a large enough Varrio that its membership is represented inside penal establishments including the Los Angeles County Jail and California state work camps and prisons. Illicit workers who were affiliated with VNE benefit from the protection of the gang if they spent time in prison. The experiences of Scorpio, a twenty-one-year-old member of VNE, illustrated this dynamic. Scorpio was implicated in an auto theft that several members of VNE participated in. Because his firearm was used in the incident, he received a longer prison sentence than the other participants in the robbery, and he spent about two years in state prison. “Prison wasn’t too bad,” he said. “I had all my homeboys in there, and they help you out a lot. They get you what you need and teach you how to deal with the prison and everything, and they make sure that other people don’t fuck with you or anything like that. I mean, it wasn’t too different in there from out here except it was really boring.”Another VNE member described how VNE membership affected his short stay in county for armed robbery. As really scared going in,” he confided. “Because I’d heard all this stuff about how they treat you so bad. But because I was in VNE they put me in the special gang unit. So I only had to share my room with one other guy. He was from some other neighborhood. We didn’t really talk much or anything. It was better where we were than in general population where you have to deal with all the drunks and all that stuff.”Whether they were incarcerated or not, the gang played an important role for illicit workers in Estrada Courts. Against the background of tense police-community relations, many residents of the low-income barrios sympathized with local street gangs even if they had little affection for violent inter-gang wars. Gang wars were not as pressing a problem in Estrada Courts as in nearby barrios because the VNE gang had consolidated the physical territory of the whole barrio. In the neighborhood, gang membership had some important advantages as well as some drawbacks for illicit workers. One drawback was that police recognized the signs of gang membership. They targeted enforcement efforts against residents who looked like “gangsters”-even if a “baldy” hairstyle, baggy pants, or distinctive makeup was adopted as a fashion statement more than in accordance with the requirements of membership. On the positive side, gang membership provided access to specialized training and introduction to valuable social contacts for those who participated in more sophisticated illicit enterprises. In addition, membership was a form of social capital that could prove especially valuable to illicit workers who spent time in jail or prison.

. . . . From the book ~> The Price of Poverty.

8/4/07

A PRAYER AND A WISH

WHAT HAPPENED TO ALL THE HOMIES?
Where have all my HomeBoys gone?

Don’t see them around no more
Used to be a Gang of us all
At the alley or at the poolhall

at the courtyard or the school yard
on the hillside;
at the hangout or on the Boulevard

You met up with them at the beach
or Cinco de Mayo at the park

You gathered up at the parties
at them weddings or quinceƱeras
at them baptisms or at the hall

All around the Varrio
and in all them cross-roads
You’d run into them at the corner
or at the liquor store

You’d look over the fence and look who's there?
The Homeboys where always there!
Nite & Day
Day in--Nite out

Seemed like the Boys would forever be there
Never ever going nowhere
But One by One surely
~> I’ve lost most

They’ve moved on
Some for better, some for worse
And before no time
~> I stand here most alone

The memories of their laffs
are all mostly gone
Shadows and phantoms
their faces have become

Most Locos I remember
some barely at all
I look back in time and realize
~> I miss them all

And I wonder much ‘bout them
now that I’m gettin’ old
Why we all broke?

Then I think 'bout the things that happened
and the situations that caught most
Life or death took hold of us all
Away from the Varrio
Away from our homes

How did it all happen?
Sometimes it hurts to know
Time did not wait up on none
It came upon us so quickly
and before you know
~> Away we go

Homeboy by Homeboy
Day by Day
Year by Year
And today they’re all gone

Taken from me for this or that
by these or those
the causes, you already know

By a mad bullet or by a cruel system
By a dream come true, or a promise made
By a bad fix or an evil woman
By a reckoning, or a Saviors’ Love

In any case
I don’t see them around much no more
Some even forever no more
I shed a tear for those
And for the rest

“A prayer and a wish from mi Corazon.”

A Lonewolf Memory!

7/7/07

WELCOME TO L.A.

By Lonewolf

The big city skyscrapers overwhelm me; they look like they can reach the sky. The city streets look murky and the light off the street lamps reflect off the watery fluids covering the sidewalks. There’s an uneasy feeling about this place. Everything looks so eerie; everything looks like it’s out of proportion with little me. Block after city block, more of the same. Gloomy faces stare at me when the cab stops at the light. They look drunk, they look hopeless, and they look like living dead. Bodies in motion, fast moving, while others lay sprawled across the sidewalks, seems like they’re dead. This is the city of Los Angeles, the one heard about so much in family talk, the one seen more than a few times in pictures or on some movie. But it is nothing like what one imagined; it’s nothing like that glamorous scene that people can get off a story or a magazine. Then the streets pull out from that skyscraper jungle and head out past a continuous row of graffiti covered walls. Into a never ending sea of buildings and warehouses; past rail road tracks, past some freeway underpass, pass some dim lit gas station, but through all this, even in the night one can see that there’s few trees in this concrete jungle. Then the houses begin. Wood framed houses for the most part, but stucco houses abound too. South L.A. from what is said to me. Low chain link fences everywhere, few people walking about, and few people hanging out, there’s a scary feeling to this lack of activity, so different from back home, so much lacking in friendly neighborhood activity it appears. Shadows in the night don’t appear to be causal; they appear more like victims of the night. This is it, here we are, our new home here in Los Angeles, it is called Florence and how far removed it was from my birthplace, how far removed from my friends and from all the faces I knew. Here I start anew, here I learned a new way, amongst the warrior races. A stranger in the land called Florencia. Nothing like that Leave it to Beaver show with them nice homes and big green lawns, no sir, this is the real L.A. The place I came to dread and love. Like most others, I grew up experiencing what its surroundings offered, going to and fro, jumping over moving rail cars, dashing across contested grounds, climbing over fences, walking thru empty lots, brawling and fighting with White kids, with Black kids, and even some Mexican kids. Everyone could either be friend or foe; one just had to live day by day. A walk to the Carl’s Junior could mean a run back home, a trip to the RTD bus stop to go downtown could get you face to face with a hostile. I longed to get out, I wished I could return back home, but this was my home now, so I learned to cope and I adjusted. Soon I became another kid in the neighborhood, and soon I was alright at school and on weekends I could walk to the swimming pool in Huntington Park with the rest of the neighborhood crowd. I learned that all them Black faces were not all hostile, I learned that they were just like me. They liked playing ball and climbing over fences too. They liked hamburgers and ran as fast as I could too. They knew some Spanish too, and they came around to my house asking for me to join them on that street playground of ours, and yes, they even had problems with the White kids at school too. Yes this was beginning to feel more like home everyday. . Then mom hits me with the news. We’re moving next week. . Here we go again. .

WELCOME TO L.A.

Land of the transitory family.

4/5/07

BLAST FROM THE PAST!

CREASED UP TRAMOS

FOLDED UP RAGS

SPIT SHINED CALCOS

LOADED UP MAGS

WEAPONS IN POSSESSION

GLOCKS, 38's, AK's AND TEC-9's

TROUBLE MAKERS AT THE SPOT

A WILD AND CRAZY BUNCH

HOLDING UP THE DANGER ZONE

PROTECTING SACRED GROUNDS

OUTSIDERS KEEP OUT

WICKED MINDS, EVIL EYES

ASSESING THE TREATH LEVEL

24/7/365

MONITORING TRAFFIC

CONTROLANDO

STAYING TRUCHA WACHANDO

NO SLACKING WHILE ON DUTY

TRAMANDO MOVIDAS

THINKING UP A SCORE

STAYING TRUE TO THE VENENO

TAKING THEM MEDS

JUICED UP, KOOLED OUT

WHACKED UP, SPACED OUT

ON CLOUD 9

LIVING ON STOLEN TIME

WASTED DAYS, WASTED LIVES

SUICIDAL TENDENCIES

DANGEROUS MINDS

HUNTERS AND PREDATORS

GOING TRIBAL

STAKING CLAIM

NOTORIOUS IN THE MAKING

BROWN SOULS ON FIRE

MAJESTICS OF THE DARK

TRIPPIN OUT UNDER THE STARS

WASTING BRAIN CELLS

CHUGGIN DOWN CAHUAMAS

BURNING UP THE GRASS

BUZZING AND SPINNING

STONED FACES

HAPPY FACES

DROOPY FACES

ROOKIE FACES

HARD FACES

SERIO FACES

GOLDEN GLOVES

RECORD HOLDERS

PRO’S AND AMATEURS

WISE OWLS

MUSICIANS

ATHLETES

STREET ARTISTS

WEAPONS SPECIALISTS

YOUNG AND OLDER

NOBLE SAVAGES

GUERRILLA CITY

EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

NATURAL BORN CRITICS

TALKING SMACK

TELLING TALL TALES

TALES FROM LA PINTA

TALES FROM THE LIFE

STORIES OF BRAVERY

ESTABLISHING RANK

CASE SHARING

NOTE COMPARING

RUNNING IT DOWN

PLAYING IT COOL

TALES FROM THE HOOD

SOCIALIZING

OUTDOOR LIFE

HOLDING DOWN THE FORT

HOLDING UP THE WALL

STRIKING UP THE POSE

CREATURES OF THE NIGHT

WIZARDS, VILLAINS,

SPOOKS AND SHADOWS

ASSOCIATES IN CRIME

THROWING ON THE GLOVES

FIGHT NIGHT ON THE BLOCK

DUMPING DOWN ON RECRUITS

SIZING UP

MEASURING UP

MAN UP, STAND UP

JUNGLE LIVIN’

LIVING IN THE WILD

LEARNING UP THE LAW

CONCRETE JUNGLE LAW

NO ESCAPE, NO WAY OUT

HOLD STRONG

TIME'S UP

TAKE UP THE COLLECTION

WHO’S MAKING THE RUN

MORE PISTO, MAS DROGA

ALL DUSTED UP

BRAIN TWISTER

MIND LAPSE

PAUSE AND RE-PLAY

GO BACK AND REWIND

INTO THE SPIN ZONE

DOWN A SPIRAL

TUMBLING DOWN

WALK AT YOUR OWN RISK

CRASHING INTO HOMIES

RAINING PISS ON THE TREE

HUNCH UP ON THE LAMP POST

EMPTYING UP LAS TRIPAS

TAKING UP A CURB SEAT

ON A THIN LINE

BUT NO SURRENDER

LOSEN UP ON THE MIND

TUNE UP THE POSTURE

ANTE UP

CRANK IT UP

WIRE UP SUM

COME BACK TO LIFE

EVIL IS BACK

THE DREAD IS GONE

CRACK UP ON THEM JOKES

THE LAFFS ARE ON YOU

DRINK UP MORE CAGADA

BUMP UP THE TUNES

START UP WITH THE TARGET PRACTICE

STREET LAMPS ARE OUT

DROP DRILL PRACTICE

STRANGE HEADLIGHTS AROUND

SIZE UP THE VISIT

HOLD UP ON THE BLAST

VISITORS LOOK FINE

VAMPIRAS Y MOMIAS

FREAKS OF THE NIGHT

LAS MORRAS ARE SPICED

BRINGING DOWN THE INVITE

LOOKING FOR BALLERS

GAME TIME FOR SUM

WORD COMES FROM THE WICKED

STRAP DOWN AND HEAT UP

CHUMP BUSTING TIME

STRIPE EARNERS

THRILL SEEKERS

JUMP INTO THE RIDE

WAR WAGON IN MOTION

RIDING SHOTGUN ON THE FRONT

CRUSIN' ALONG IN THE CHARIOT MOBILE

RUFF RIDING THE STREETS OF HELL

GRIMMY GRAFITTI COVERED WALLS GO BY

PAST BROKEN WINDOWS WITH IRON BARS

PAST SIGN COVERED LIQUOR STORE FRONTS

CRUSIN' WITH THE SOUNDS

SINISTER SIDE ON THE LOOKOUT

ON A MISSION FROM THE SOUTH SIDE

CRUSIN' DOWN TO FIND SUM

PLACAS ON THE PROWL

STROBE LIGHTS RACE BY

STREET JUSTICE LEAGUE

4 TO A RIDE

BACK UP IN THE SKY

JUST ANOTHER SUMMER NITE

TWIST AND TURNS TO AVOID

ADVENTURE AND STATUS ON HOLD

THE HOMEGIRLS PAD IS WHERE WE LAND

COWBOYS AND GIRLS MIXING IT UP

FRESHEN UP THE SPIT

SWAP SOME SPIT

FIRME MUSIC STARTS FLOWING

FEMALES WANNA DANCE

SHADOW DANCING

VATOS GRABBING ASS

BODIES IN MOTION

TIME TO PAIR UP

PINCHING CHICHIS

FINGER BANGING

DROPPING CHONES

POPPING CHERRIES

BACK SEAT BUMPING

TEARING UP THE BUSH

TAKE HER TO THE SHACK

TO FINISH OUT THE NIGHT

ECHANDO MAS PALO

TALES FROM LA CAMA

TALES FROM THE GANG

BIG TIME GANGSTER TIMES

A BLAST FROM THE PAST!

2/24/07

CON SAFOS

CON SAFOS!

Lit. “WITH A SLIP”

SAFOS comes from the Sp. ZAFAR

Lit. TO GET AWAY FROM and BE RID OF

In other words “ESCAPE FROM”

As in “UNCAPTURED”

Or “UNTOUCHED”

And “UNBLEMISHED”

To be “FREE OF”

“SLIP AWAY FROM”

As in “Soltar o Desatar”

To Losen from or Untie from . . .

And “Librarse o Evitar”

As in >> Set free from or Elude and Evade

. . . from an encounter or a risk!
. . . from an annoyance or a troublesome bother!
. . . from obstacles or any hindrance!

As in “DESAFANARSE”

From the prefix DES and the verb HACER . . .

. . . To un-make

. . . To un-do

As in “to keep something from happening.”
Or “to prevent an occurrence.”

Con Safos therefore is definitive of getting rid of
and doing away with . . .

As in . . .

Desquitar . . . “Get even with”

Derrotar . . . “Defeat any”

Or

Dehacer . . . As in “Do away with”

Meaning . . .

. . . “To kill someone”

So when the Homeboys would add C/S Con Safos
in their placasos, they essentially were giving fair
warning that their placaso was to remain unblemished
and free of insults, otherwise, retaliation would occur
and someone would be paying the price for any
desecration of the holy writ.


CON SAFOS


would be best translated as


“RESPECT OR BEWARE”

2/18/07

EL PEDO RIFA

PEDO is Spanish for FART.

A four letter word with such a simple meaning or so it appears to be.

But is it?

Fart in the English language sounds very vulgar, so much so that most people use the word preferably only amongst friendly company and then only when for the most part it is necessary to do so, but when in the presence of others not inclusive of your circle of friends and relations, most people prefer to either abstain from using the word, or, they make use of the substitute descriptor “breaking wind”. When one does happen to hear the word “fart”, it'smore than likely that it is mentioned in passing, or as part in a joke. Hell, you don’t even hear the word fart or farted in criticism when someone cuts one lose at the wrong place and the wrong time. If anything at all, maybe what you’ll hear is some kid caught in the background saying something like >> pheeew-yu, that smells nasty!

The fart word in the English language remains dull and nasty, devoid from any alternative definitions for popular use by the mainstream English speaking populace.

This however is not the same case with its Spanish language counterpart >> the “PEDO” which is very much alive and full of serviceable meanings and descriptors for the every day Calo & Spanglish slang of Mexicans and Chicanos. In the every day language of La Raza, el PEDO takes on a crude and simple role in terminology; neverthe less, EL PEDO packs very potent meanings in the many contexts for which it placed in substitute for the more proper Spanish language terms. Under such a wide-definition role, EL PEDO can be incorporated into so much communications (spoken or otherwise), that it would be most difficult to replace it with other terms without the message losing its force in meaning and brevity.

PEDO carries both, a term of endearment when used within a friendly context, or, a potent warning and challenge when applied into an unfriendly context. Under such, EL PEDO goes on to become a common term of choice by many Mexicans and Chicanos. PEDO by being accepted as a normal form of communication by the general Mexican/Chicano population, goes on to form a part of the cultural heritage and is included as part of the Calo vocabulary of the community; thus, it refuses to be relegated into obscurity as is the case with its English counterpart.

We already know that PEDO translates as FART in the English language, but even though this translation is the correct one, a more appropriate and of very similar definitions in its every day use, would be none other than “SHIT.” However, EL PEDO, as defined within La Raza's slang vocabulary, adds-on a much wider field of definitions, and it thrives within the variables which exist in the common language used in our communities.

So what are some of the most common and heard of applications for “EL PEDO? Well, it all depends on the context of the message in which it is included. To understand the entire variables for which PEDO can be understood; it would best be done by interpreting the meaning under each context in which it is incorporated. While in most cases, one can easily associate PEDO with the similar “SHIT” of the English language; this however, may not always be the best interpretation. Nevertheless, PEDO can be easily understood when you read or hear the message. It is not hard to interpret it, since it is very simple in its application, as well as, "being the key word in the message."

So here we go with some of the most common heard of applications used for EL PEDO.

Quieres PEDO?
>You wanna some shit with me?
(A respond with a challenge warning)

Buscas PEDO?
>You looking for trouble?
(A respond with a challenge warning)

Busca PEDOS.
>A troublemaker/trouble seeker.

No Busques PEDO.
>Don’t be looking for trouble.

Se Avento Un PEDO.
>He broke wind.
>He handled some beef.

Te Aventaste Un PEDO.
>You broke some wind?
>You took care of some beef.

Te metiste en un PEDO.
>You got into some messy shit.

Te Echaste Un PEDO?
>You broke some wind?
>You brought the beef on yourself.
>You fucked up with that shit.
>You got yourself in a mess.
>You fouled up with them/those words..
>You’re off the mark.

Sacale Un PEDO.
>Scare the shit outta him.
>Spook his ass.

Le Saque Un PEDO.
>I scared the shit outta him.
>I spooked his ass.
>I scared him shitless.

Le Saque Un PEDOTE.
>I scared some big shit outta his ass.
(Pedote, the “TE” in the word ending, denotes a bigger or
larger size/quantity than the regular/normal size/quantity.)

Esta PEDO.
>He’s drunk.

Es Bien PEDO.
>He’s a big time drunk.

Se Puso PEDO.
>He got all drunk.

Bien PEDOTE
>He got wasted drunk.
(Pedote, the “TE” in the word ending, denotes a bigger or
larger size/quantity than the regular/normal size/quantity.)

PEDORRO or PEDORRON
>A fart ass / farter.
>A shit talker.
>A problem fool.
(Pedorro or Pedorron is a derivative from PEDO which
puts includes the emphasis of being bigger or larger in
size or quantity.)

PEDORRO
>Is also a term of endearment when in reference to the
females nalgas/ass.
For example; “Esa Morra tiene buen PEDORRO”
>That Girl has a nice ass.

You can also substitute PEDORRO with PEDORROTE
which carries an even larger/bigger emphasis than the norm.

PEDORROTE
For example: “Esa Morra tiene un gran PEDORROTE”
>That girl has a nice BIG ass.

PEDORRIN
Pedorro in it diminutive form = PEDORRIN.
>A little fart ass.
And it can be used as an insult, like for example;
“Ese guey en un Pedorrin”
That fool is a “lil nobody”

Que PEDO?
>What of it?
>What Up?
>What gives?
(Depending of the attitude and tone of voice when this is
put forth, it packs a clear warning to any challenge.)

Soplate Otro PEDO.
>Blow out with some real shit.

Que PEDO Pasa?
>What’s going on?
>What the fuck is happening?

Parale A Ese PEDO!
>Hold up with that shit.

Parale Al PEDO!
>Put a stop to it..

Calmate Con Tu PEDO!
>Calm down with your shit.

Calma Tu PEDO!
>Calm your ass down.

Ni PEDO!
>Oh well!

No Hay PEDO.
>It’s cool.
>No problem.
>No worries.
>It’s all good.

Puro PEDO.
>Is nothing but hot air/sack of wind.
As in “Ese Vato es Puro Pedo”
That dude ain’t shit.

also . . .

Es Puro PEDO.
>Just fucking around messing with you.
(Like when you’re playing on people’s nerves.)

Se Acabo Este PEDO.
>This here ____ is finished/done with.

Este PEDO termino.
>This beef got settled.

Se Calmo El PEDO.
>The shit calmed down.

Echale PEDO.
>Push Up on Him.
>Hit The Fool Up.
(A deliberate provocation / a hostile challenge)

Huele A PEDO.
>Things don’t feel right.
>Smells like trouble.
>Smells like shit.
(Used to describe a bad feeling or someone who
smells nasty or foul >> for example >> A Cop.

Aguanta El PEDO.
>Bare up with this shit.
>Kick back and relax some.

Sopla PEDOS.
>Blow some wind (Whistleblower)

PEDO Madre!
>Bullshit mothafockr!

Es Un PEDO.
>He’s a drunkard.
>It’s a problem.
>It’s a hassle.

Es Un PEDOTE.
>He’s a real big drunkard.
>It’s a huge ass problem.
>It’s a real big hassle.

No Saca Ni Un PEDO.
>He won’t pitch in for jack shit.

No Le Sacas Ni Un PEDO.
>You won’t get not even shit outta him.

Trae PEDOS.
>He’s got problems.
>He’s got the heat on him.

TRAES PEDOS?
>You’re carrying any shit on you?
>You bringing problems down with you?

PEDO Codo.
>Tightass mothafockr.

Mucho PEDO.
>Too much trouble.

Es PEDO O Que?
>Are you just messing with me or is it for real?

Avientate El PEDO.
>Handle the shit/mission.
>Take the fall/Be the fall guy.

Cantale PEDO.
>Challenge his ass.

Calienta PEDOS.
>A bench warmer / lazy ass mofo.

Bien Calienta PEDOS.
>Shit starter / provocateur.

Ruge A PEDO.
>This shit stinks.
>It reaks.

PEDO Y LOCO.
>Drunk and Stoned.

Truena PEDOS.
>Fart ass.

Acaba El PEDO.
>Put an end to that shit.

Ponle Gas Al PEDO.
>Get a move on it.
>Speed the shit up.
>Put some real effort on it.

Cual PEDO?
What shit?

Cual Es Tu PEDO?
>What’s your problem?
>What’s your beef?
>Why you trippin’?

Cual Es El PEDO?
>What’s wrong with it?
>What’s the problem?

Que Es Tu PEDO?
>What’s the deal with you?
>What’s your business?

Cargaste con El PEDO.
>You took the blame for it.

Donde Es El PEDO?
>Where’s that shit?

Donde Esta El Pedo?
>Where’s the problem at?
>Where is the shit happening at?

Vas Con PEDOS.
>You’re carrying too much weight on you..
>You got too many issues following you.

Traes PEDOS.
>You’re bringing in issues.

Mas PEDOS.
>More hassles.
>More shit.

Ponle Al PEDO.
>Get on down with it.
>Get working on it.

Rasca PEDOS.
>Butt scratcher.

Besa PEDOS.
>Kiss ass.

Sin PEDO.
>With no hassles.
>Don’t worry about it.
>Without any fuzz.

Saca PEDOS.
>A real pesty mofo.
>A mofo that always be fuckin’ with people.
>A mofo that always be bringing up some shit.

Quitame EL PEDO.
>Take the weight off of me.
>Let me off the hook.

Pase Un PEDO.
>Some shit happened.
>I ran into problems.

PEDO Con Caca.
>A drunk in vomit.

Ese Es Tu PEDO.
>That’s your problem.

Es Tu PEDO.
>That’s your business.
>That’s your deal.

Cuenta Puro PEDOS.
>Tells nothing but fairy tales.

Grande PEDO.
>Big Shit.

Bien Grande El PEDO.
>That was some real big shit.
>The shit is real big.

Se Armo El PEDO.
>The shit exploded.
>The beef got started.
>The blows broke out.

Cuanto PEDO?
How much of a hassle?

Wachate como esta el PEDO.
>Check out on how this shit works.

Wachate este PEDO.
>Trip out on this shit.

Wachaste el PEDO?
>Did you see that shit?

Ese es el PEDO.
>That’s the shit right there.
>That’s what the problem is.
>That’s how this shit plays out.

EL PEDO.
>The shit.
>The thing.
>The trouble.
>The hassle.
>The drunk.
>The lie.
>The mess.
>The task.
>The mission.

EL PEDO RIFA! C/S