10/9/13

HARBOR AREA VARRIOS

L.A. HARBOR AREA VARRIOS ~ Past & Present

RANCHO SAN PEDRO
Santos,
Locos,
Midgets,
3RD Street Locos,
8TH Street Locos,
12TH Street Troubles,
16TH Street Locos,
Santa Cruz Street Locos,
Rancho Projects 2ND Street Locos.

PARK WESTERN LOMA SAN PEDRO
Malditos,
Locos,
Chicos.

LELAND PARK SAN PEDRO
Hoods,
Boys,
Locos.

BARRIO SAN PEDRO
3RD Street Locos,
11TH Street Locos,
Los Guayabos,
Los Uniteds.

SAN PEDRO LOCOS

SAN PEDRO STONERS

YOUNG CROWD

EAST SIDE WILMAS
Ghost Town Locos,
Lumber Yard Malos.
L ST Locos,
Mahar Street Boys,
Hyatt Street Locos,
Chain Gang,
Banning Park Locos.

WEST SIDE WILMAS
Willhall Park Locos,
Dana Locos,
Lil Rascals,
C Street Locos.

NORTH SIDE WILMAS

HARBOR CITY RIFA
Baby Locos,
Tiny Locos,
Lil Locos,
Peewee Locos

VARRIO HARBOR LOMA

VARRIO LA LOMA RIFA

VARRIO CARSON RIFA
Peewee Locos,
Deathman Locos,
East Side Carson Locos,
Catskill Street Locos,

Ravenna Street
Locos
Tiny Locos

Realty Street
Locos
Peewees
Gunners

NIGHTCRAWLERS RIFA

VARRIO KEYSTONE

VICTORIA PARK
Locos,
Tiny Gangsters,
Park Locos,
Peewees,
Midgets,
Niteowls.

DOMINGUEZ VARRIO 13
J Street Locos.

EAST SIDE TORRANCE
Lil Raskals,
Diablos,
Peewees.

204TH STREET
Peewees,
Locos.

VARRIO CENTRO TORRANCE
Locos

T x FLATS
Dukes,
Snipers,
Peewees.

VARRIO LA RANA

NORTH SIDE REDONDO
Los Nietos,
Lil Winos,
Sycos.

DEF BOYS
Chicos,
Killas,
Babys.

DEATH CROWD
Locos,
Lil Boys,
Riders,
Termites.

EVIL KLAN 13

HAWTHORNE 13

LAWNDALE 13
Chicos
154 ST
147 ST
Traviesos
Firmona Boys
Malitos
Baby Dukes

LIL MOBSTERS 13

CYCOS 13

DOG TOWN STONERS

LIL WATTS
Demons,
Dukes,
Winos,
Traviesos,
The Underground.

GARDENA 13
East Side,
West Side,
Baby Gangsters,
Lil Locos,
Cyco Locos,
Balas,
144TH The Fourth,
The Dead End.

LATIN TOWN PLAYBOYZ

BARRIO SMALL TOWN
4TH Street,
Locos,
Tiny Winos.

TE TOWN FLATS

BARRIO VIEJO
Old Town Longo

BARRIO POBRE
16TH Street.

PLAYA LARGA 13
10TH Street.

8TH STREET MADNESS
Midnites.

VARRIO 9TH STREET

CRAZY LATIN BOYZ

MID CITY STONERS / CRIMINALS
Long Beach Locos 19TH Street.

NORTH SIDE LONGO
Baby Gangsters
52ND Street,
Vagos,
Machos,
Market Street Locos,
Ninos Surenos,
Youngsters.

WEST SIDE LONGO
Cyclones,
Termites,
Stoners,
West Side Playboyz,
Summit Canal Street,
Sequina Street.

EAST SIDE LONGO
Chicos Malos,
Dukes,
Tiny Locos,
Stoners,
East Side Playboyz,
Lonely Boys,
Peewess,
Barrio Viejo (Old Town Longo).

10/8/13

VARRIO LA RANA

LA RANA

Everyone in the Harbor Area knows or has heard about LA RANA in Torrance.

La Rana is one of those Varrios that have been dying off, but never really goes away. You hear about them, but you never really see them, or so it goes. Even so, they’ve managed to make the headlines from time to time. La Rana must be a real tight-knit family oriented varrio these days. Their neighborhood history goes back to the 1920s/30s, but the varrio is more well-renown for its crazyness during the 1950s and 60s. It managed to stay active well into the 70s, but by the 1980s it was mostly gone, mainly on account of the heavy industry that blew up around their neighborhood. Even though the barrio did grew up amidst industry; Nevertheless, the new industry took over more and more lots and pieces, and its streets disappeared, with many of its homes done away to create new and wider streets., To where eventually all that was left of La Rana is the strip between Van Ness Way and Crenshaw along Del Amo Blvd. That’s all that remains today of the old La Rana, some 100 homes along that strip. That’s if you don’t count the neighborhood area where V204ST (Southwest Village) is located at.

La Rana once roamed all the zone in-between Dolanco Junction (TxFlats) on the east; 190TH on the north; Torrance Blvd on the south; and west to Madrona/Prairie Avenue. But VLR has always been centered on Del Amo Blvd. The place is completely surrounded by industrial plants and business parks these days. Mobil refinery on the north, Dow Chemical to the west, PS Business Park and Honda R&D to its south, with Van Ness Avenue and another business park cutting it off from V204TH.

La Rana is said to have adopted the name because of a near-by little lake or pond; some have even called it an old swamp area, where you could hear the frogs croak and sing through out the night. That little lake of a pond was there going back to the 1800s.

The area was known as El Pueblo; hence the name of the Pueblo tiny little Recreation Center , dead smack in the middle of the neighborhood. In fact, Del Amo Blvd was oldenly known as PUEBLO street (Camino del Pueblo), when it was still a small dirt street back in the (Mexican Village) days.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/80643375@N00/280246500/

I’ve never known what cliques La Rana ever spawned, but looking at that rare Flickr picture of that gutted and worn out small market wall, there’s a placaso next to all the La Rana hit ups that read “ROAD GENTS”; Thus I wonder if that had anything to do with Del Amo Blvd ~> The Road to La Gente de La Rana (?)

On a hot sunny weekend if you pass through there you’re bound to see firme ranflas on those driveways of the strip, not in every house, but there’s some, even though today those homes on that calle don’t look ghetto barrio looking shacks or anything like that.

La Rana you could say is the only true "City of Torrance" Varrio because the other main Varrios in Torrance are really L.A. “Harbor Gateway”.

La Rana (Del Amo Blvd.) is technically in the section of town which is considered “East Torrance”. East Torrance goes from 190Th to Plaza Del Amo ~> entrance to the village of “Barrio East Side Torrance” on the southernmost tip of the town. I wonder if that has anything to do as to why there’s some real animosity documented between VLR & BEST (?).. since they’re both really from the same “SIDE” of town, on opposite corners, of course.

La Rana most definitely hates TxFlats, and they have also been known to put the clamp on V204TH.

V204ST is something of an abnormality in the area politics, since both La Rana & TxFlats are said to claim suzerainty over them. Both Varrios claim to have spawned V204TH, but I would lean more towards VLR getting 204 started, because I used to work with this vato from La 204 who told me so. The thing is, eventually, and like it happens everywhere else, V204TH went on a solo career, and then they went on to make the headlines that you all have read plenty about. But if 204 would of stayed VLR, it would of most definitely kept La Rana on the mainline of the streets in the Harbor Area. But as it stands, La Rana is the enigmatic old Torrance varrio that refuses to go away.



...................................

Old Neighborhood Has Long Outgrown Barrio Status
El Pueblo Thrives, Surrounded by Workaday World

May 05, 1985|JULIO MORAN, Times Staff Writer

TORRANCE — The face of industrial Torrance is changing after nearly 75 years. So, too, is El Pueblo.

Surrounded by industrial activity, El Pueblo--which means "the town" in Spanish--remains a residential island in a sea of warehouses and factories. But rather than being deserted or rezoned for industrial use over the years, El Pueblo has blossomed into a vibrant, well-kept, close-knit neighborhood.

And except for the shadows cast by the Mobil Oil refinery towers on one side and the frames of multistory warehouses going up on the other side, the 111 homes along Del Amo Boulevard between Crenshaw Boulevard and Van Ness Avenue are typical of other middle-class neighborhoods in this city.

"When it comes down to the nitty-gritty, we are Torrance," said Ruben Ordaz, 57, a lifelong resident of the area and president of the Pueblo Homeowners Assn.

Early Reputation

The neighborhood is also called Del Amo and La Rana, which means "the frog" in Spanish and got its name because a nearby pond was once full of frogs. The neighborhood has overcome a reputation as a poor, tough barrio and come to be considered a community of concerned homeowners whose votes are courted at each local election.

"The politicians know that we got about 100 votes," said Ordaz with a smile. "We usually vote in a bloc, so when we call we get a quick response."

Getting a bloc vote is easier, Ordaz said, because many of the residents are related. Ordaz's father, who moved here in 1925, still lives on the block, as do his uncle, aunt and several in-laws. When a family member dies, property is usually passed on to a relative.

Property values are slightly lower than in other neighborhoods in the city, but it still costs about $120,000 to buy a two-bedroom house here. An empty 50- by 100-foot lot has recently been appraised at $20,000.

High Offer for Home

"What do you think, just because I live in La Rana that I live in a shack?" Irene Ordaz, Ruben's wife, said she told a friend recently after the friend expressed surprise over her four-bedroom home. Ordaz said they have received offers of up to $150,000 for their home.

And the crime rate, once a major problem, what with youth gangs and drug dealers during the 1950s and 1960s, has dropped. Last year, a community watch program was organized.

Torrance Police Sgt. Wally Murker, a community relations officer, said the area may still have more drug problems than many sections of Torrance, but other neighborhoods have more burglaries. "I couldn't say it was any . . . different than other neighborhoods in Torrance," he said. "There are a lot of good people living there and they've got a good community watch program."

For the most part, living in the midst of industries has not bothered the residents. In the early years it was a matter of not biting the hand that fed them, Ruben Ordaz said, so residents tolerated the industrial noises and smells. Today, tighter pollution controls have eliminated most of the concerns, and the residents have learned to live with what remains .

Grew Up in Area

"Sometimes you wonder if your coughing is not because of Mobil or if your house is not going to blow up," said Joe Torres, 42, a receiving clerk. Torres grew up in El Pueblo, and except for a few years right after he got married, he has remained in the area.

But the possibility of industrial accidents is not a major concern. "My kids talk about it sometimes, but they also talk about nuclear wars and earthquakes," Torres said. "It's at the back of your mind, but it's a way of life here."

Surprisingly, there has never been any serious talk of rezoning the street for industrial use, city officials said.

"It's almost like a historical area," said Jeff Gibson of the city planning department. "I don't think it will ever get rezoned."

But city officials did not always look so kindly on what was originally referred to as the Mexican Village.

According to the book "Historic Torrance," land in the 1920s was designated for five uses: business, residential, industrial, unclassified, and "special quarters for non-Caucasians." It was in the "foreign quarters" that El Pueblo developed as the residential district for the Mexican labor that worked at Columbia Steel and Pacific Electric Railway.

Treading on Constitution

The book says Jared Sidney Torrance, the city's founder, admitted in his autobiography that segregation in his fledgling town "tread pretty hard on the toes of the Constitution of the United States."

Even former Mayor Albert Isen, whose father and uncle built the homes in the 1920s so workers could walk to the steel plant half a mile away, said the houses were "substandard, because that's all they really wanted and all they could really afford."

Ordaz, a former steelworker and now a custodian with the Torrance school district, said the homes remained in poor condition for many years, primarily because of language and cultural obstacles that kept residents--most of whom came from the small Mexican town of Purepero, Michoacan--from acquiring building permits for remodeling their homes.

Now those houses have been passed on to family members who are U.S.-born and who speak English. Many of the homes have been improved, and Del Amo, once a dirt road, is now a four-lane street with a center divider.

Spanish, once the only language spoken on this street, is hardly ever heard now. Even the one weekly Mass celebrated at St. Joseph's Catholic Church at the end of the block is said in English.

5/31/13

L.A. COUNTY SIDES

This whole east side this, west side that., it serves a purpose., but it gets just mad confusing sometimes., por ejemplo, dog town., the older gente from the proyects all claim east side., some of the newer gente starting like in the 70s, claimed west side for the mere fact that the pjs landed on the wrong side of the river when the leeve was built., but dog town has very little to do with the west side other than having some pleitos with some., and then there's the nela/monte vista side which claims nela every day, even if the ogs are all from the pjs., if anything they should of just claimed east side because at the time when dog town set up up shop right there, there was also varrio NELA 13 around., besides that, back then, nobody really claimed nela., you would not catch an Avenues claiming nela., all that nela side came afterwards., so things change i suppose., just like that whole area code deal., from 213 to 310 to 323., hope your leave a piece of your sleeves clean for the next area code., right!?


IN THE WORLD OF VARRIOS, IT'S A TRIPPY THING HOW ALL "SIDES" AND "AREAS" BREAK DOWN IN A CITY LIKE L.A.

YOU GOT THE EAST SIDE, THE WEST SIDE, THE SOUTH SIDE, THE HARBOR AREA, SOUTH CENTRAL, THE SGV, THE 818, ETC, ETC.

BUT EACH ONE OF THOSE "SIDES" OR "AREAS" BREAK DOWN EVEN FURTHER, AND SOME VARRIOS CLAIM ONE SIDE WHEN THEY'RE COMPLETELY IN A DIFFERENT ZONE, OR EVEN CLAIM ONE THING, LIKE FOR EXAMPLE CLAIMING SOUTH CENTRAL, WHILE THE NEXT DOOR VARRIO CLAIMS SOUTH SIDE.

A RIVER, A FREEWAY, SOME HILLS, A CITY ZONE, THEY ALL SERVE TO BREAK DOWN THE CITY INTO DIFFERENT SIDES, AND IT'S ALL A TRIPPY THING., I GUESS YOU GOT TO REALLY GET INTO IT TO MAKE SENSE OUT OF IT ALL.

IN OLD CITY TIMES YOU HAD WHAT THE GABACHOS CONSIDERED EAST L.A., BUT THE EAST L.A. BACK IN THOSE OLD TIMES WAS NOT THE SAME EAST L.A. OF PRESENT TIMES (MARAVILLA/BELVEDERE/CITY TERRACE), NOPES, THE EAST L.A. BACK THEN WAS LINCOLN HEIGHTS., AND THEN THERE WAS THE GREATER EAST SIDE THAT WENT FROM ECHO PARK, ELYSIAN HILLS, AND TEMPLE BEAUDRY ON TO THE EAST GOING BEYOND THE RIVER AND UP TO THE HILLS STRETCHING FROM EAGLE ROCK TO BELVEDERE., EVEN THE IMMEDIATE AREA KNOWN AS THE LOW BOTTOMS (SOUTH CENTRAL L.A.) JUST SOUTH OF THE DOWNTOWN SKYLINE WAS CONSIDERED EAST SIDE.

WITH THE TIMES, THINGS HAVE CHANGED, AND NOW EVERYONE CONSIDERS THE EAST SIDE TO BE ALL EAST OF THE L.A. RIVER, FROM LINCOLN HEIGHTS TO WINTER GARDENS. BUT EVEN THE EAST SIDE TODAY IS BROKEN UP INTO EAST LOS AND EAST L.A. PROPER.

EAST L.A. PROPER IS MARAVILLA/BELVEDERE, CITY TERRACE, EASTMONT AND WINTER GARDENS, THAT'S THE EXTENT OF UNINCORP EAST L.A., BUT THE EAST SIDE LOS AREA INCLUDES BOYLE HEIGHTS, LINCOLN HEIGHTS, BROOKLYN HEIGHTS, ROSE HILLS, HAPPY VALLEY, EL SERENO, AND WYVERNWOOD.

BUT THEN YOU HAVE THE REST OF THE OLD EAST SIDERS IN NORTH EAST L.A. STILL CLAIMING TO BE PART OF THE EAST SIDE., MAINLY THOSE FROM HIGHLAND PARK, CYPRESS PARK, GLASSELL PARK, ARROYO SECO, AND MOUNT WASHINGTON., BUT THEN YOU WOULD LEAVE OUT OTHER AREAS WHICH ARE CONSIDERED TO BE PART OF N.E.L.A. POLITICS BUT ARE NOT NECESSARILY "EAST SIDERS"., AMONG THOSE ARE RIVERDALE, ATWATER AND ATWATER VILLAGE., WHICH BRINGS US TO THE QUESTION OF THE WEST SIDE.,

THERE'S WHAT IS CONSIDERED WEST SIDE, THEN THERE IS WEST LOS OR WEST L.A., WEST LOS (WEST LA) WOULD BE THOSE AREAS AND CITIES LIKE SANTA MONICA, VENICE, CULVER CITY AND SAWTELLE, AND THEN YOU THROW IN THERE WITH THE MIX THE COMMUNITIES OF MAR VISTA, PALMS, RANCHO PARK AND WEST LOS ANGELES PROPER., ALTHOUGH THEY ARE ALL TECHNICALLY WEST SIDE, ~> THE ACTUAL REDUCED "WEST SIDE" IS REALLY CONSIDERED TO BE JUST THE AREA CLOSER TO DOWNTOWN L.A. LIKE WESTLAKE, RAMPART VILLAGE, PICO UNION, KOREA TOWN, FILIPINO TOWN, ECHO PARK, LOS FELIZ, SILVER LAKE, WEST ADAMS, MID CITY, WILSHIRE, EAST HOLLYWOOD AND EVEN HOLLYWOOD ITSELF.,

EVERYTHING NORTH OF THE 10 FREEWAY, ALL THE WAY TO THE HOLLYWOOD HILLS, THAT'S THE WEST SIDE, ALTHOUGH VARRIOS SOUTH OF THE 10 FREEWAY ALSO CONSIDER THEIR AREA PART OF THE WEST SIDE, LIKE THE ONES IN THE COMMNUNITIES OF OLYMPIC PARK, JEFFERSON, WEST ADAMS AND MCMANUS.
BUT THE AREA OF L.A. BETWEEN THE 10 FWY, THE HARBOR FWY, THE CENTURY FWY, AND THE 405 FWY CAN BE SOMEWHAT OF A DILEMA. MOST VARRIOS IN THIS AREA CLAIM WEST SIDE, BUT SOME CLAIM SOUTH CENTRAL, AND SOME EVEN CLAIM SOUTH SIDE, ALL THE WHILE THE WHOLE AREA IS CONSIDERED TO BE "SOUTH WEST" SOUTH CENTRAL, OR EVEN THE WEST SIDE OF THE SOUTH SIDE, AND NOT REALLY PART OF THE WEST LOS WEST SIDE.,

THEN THERE'S THE SOUTH SIDE.,HERE IT GETS EVEN TRICKIER WITH THE WHOLE SOUTH L.A. DEAL, YOU HAVE THOSE THAT CLAIM SOUTH SIDE, THEN YOU HAVE THE ONES THAT CLAIM SOUTH CENTRAL, THEN YOU HAVE SOME THAT EVEN CLAIM CLAIM EAST SIDE., CASE EXAMPLES EAST SIDE CLANTON 14 STREET AND EAST SIDE PLAYBOYS.

FROM THE LOW BOTTOMS ON THE NORTH END, TO SOUTH LOS AND WATTS ON THE SOUTH END, TO THE L.A. RIVER ON THE EAST END, INCLUDING COLONIA VERNON, HUNTINGTON PARK, BELL, MAYWOOD, CUDAHY, SOUTH GATE, LYNWOOD, AND EVEN BELL GARDENS, THAT'S ALL CONSIDERED SOUTH SIDE L.A., THE GRAND EXCEPTION IS COMPTON (THE HUB), THEY CLAIM THEIR OWN, AND COMMUNITIES LIKE WILLOBROOK AND LYNWOOD GARDENS RIDE WITH THE HUB.

WHEN YOU GET PAST COMPTONE, YOU GET INTO WHAT IS CONSIDERED THE HARBOR AREA TODAY, BUT IN REALITY THE O.G. HARBOR AREA USED TO BE SOLELY THE TOWNS OF SAN PEDRO, WILMINGTON, LONG BEACH AND HARBOR CITY, THAT WAS THE EXTENT OF THE HARBOR AREA, BUT WITH TIMES OTHER TOWNS GOT HITCHED UP TO THE LABEL AND NOW ROLL WITH THE HxA HANDLE, LIKE LOMITA, CARSONE, TORRANCE, THE HARBOR GATEWAY AND GARDENA., IT BECAME SO THAT EVEN HAWTHORNE, LAWNDALE AND REDONDO MAY NOW CLAIM HxA.

HERE'S THE THING, THE WHOLE HxA IS ALL PART OF THE GREATER SOUTH BAY AREA, AND THE SOUTH BAY INCLUDES TOWNS LIKE LAKEWOOD, BELLFLORES AND EVEN PARAMOUNT, BUT NONE OF THOSE TOWNS CLAIM HxA.
WHICH BRINGS US TO THE NEXT AREA WHICH INCLUDES PARAMONTE, ARTESIA, HAWAIIAN GARDENS, BELLFLOWER AND DOWNEY. WHAT SIDE OR AREA DO THEY CLAIM? THEY'RE NOT HxA, THEY'RE NOT REALLY SOUTH SIDE L.A. AND THEY'RE NOT S.E.L.A. NEITHER., SO WHAT SIDE DO THEY CLAIM TO BE?

EVERYTHING NORTH OF THE 91 FWY AND EAST OF THE RIO HONDO IS CONSIDERED TO BE SOUTH EAST L.A., FROM NORWALK-LA MIRADA TO PICO RIVERA-WHITTIER IT'S ALL SOUTH EAST L.A.

THEN YOU GET INTO THE S.G.V. CAR, WHICH STRETCHES FROM PASADENA ALL THE WAY EAST TO LA VERNE, WITH POMONA ABSTAINING AND CLAIMING THEIR OWN.

PERSONALLY, I THINK THAT BASSETT, LA PUENTE, WALNUT, VALINDA, HACIENDA HEIGHTS AND ROWLAND SHOULD GO UNDER THEIR OWN HANDLE, THE PUENTE VALLEY HANDLE, BECAUSE THIS AREA IS WAY DISTANT FROM FAR OFF PLACES LIKE LA VERNE AND PASADENA. BUT SURE THING, THE OTHER TOWNS LIKE BOLEN, EL MONTE, SAN GRA, AZUSA, SAN DIMAS, DUARTE, WEST COVINA AND ROSEMEAD/SOUTH SG. SHOULD STAY SUR GANSTRO VALLEY., BUT PASADENA IS NOT ALL THERE WITH THE MAIN SGV AREA, SO I DON'T KNOW ABOUT THEM.

THE LAST AREA YOU GOT LEFT IN L.A. IS THE NORTH VALLEY, A.K.A. THE 818 (SAN FERNANDO VALLEY), BUT THE SFV IS A HUGE CHUNK OF TERRITORY, AND IT CAN BE BROKEN DOWN INTO MID-VALLEY, WEST VALLEY, AND THE SAN FER/SYLMAR/PACAS AREA ON THE NORTH EAST PART OF THE VALLEY.

BUT WHAT ABOUT BURBANK? ALTHOUGH BERBANK IS PART OF THE 818, THEY CAN NOT REALLY BE ON PAR WITH THE REST., BURBANK SHOULD MAYBE BE LUMPED IN TOGETHER WITH GLENDALE AND SUNLAND-TUJUNGA TO FORM THEIR OWN.. I DON'T KNOW.. I'M JUST SAYING.. SOME PLACES ARE HARD TO SQUARE IN WITH THE MAIN SIDE OR AREA..


It’s a trippy thing how all that claiming this side or that side works. For most hoods it is automatic what side they fall on, and by default, what side they claim. For other hoods, it is a pride thing, like pride for their city or their town. Still for some, it is about the notoriety of a place, a place which is not really confined to city maps or government boundaries (like the southwest and mexico). It doesn’t matter where the geographic line is drawn, that’s like a line in the sand. Neighborhoods are connected to the streets, and how those streets are connected is way more than simply parallel or horizontal lines drawn on a map to define a zone. In example, the Harbor Area, in ordinary regular civilian circles, the Harbor Area can also be called the South Bay, but in the world of L.A. Condado ranflas, the HxA is way more exclusive as to who claims it as its side.

The original Harbor Area was made up of four towns; San Pedro, Harbor City, Wilmas and Longo., that was it, but with time and the evolution of claiming sides, other towns latched on to the handle; Lomita, Torrance, Carson, Gardena, and the whole Gateway. Which I might add here that nobody in the HxA ever calls it the Gateway, that’s Torrance and Gardena plain and simple.

It is clear why North Side Longo and Dominguez Varrio would jump into the HxA car, but it is not so clear, at least from the outside looking in, as to why Little Lawndale and Hawthorne would do so, or for that matter even Redondo, since they’re all out there in sort of like their own side away from the main HxA focus points east of Crenshaw. A little limbo as to what side those towns are for reals; but who calls it? Who decides what side to claim? Comptone next to Gardena ain’t never claimed nothing other than The Hub., and both Paras, Bellflower or Lakewood to my knowledge also ain’t never claimed HxA, even though they are clearly in the South Bay geographical zone.

So how does it work in the calles., when, why and who decides for a varrio or town what side to claim?

Lennox and Inglewood decided on west side instead of south side or harbor area, but why didn’t they ever create a ‘west bay’ or something like that, together with the west los towns like Santa, Sotel, Venice, Culver City and Rancho Park? That probably would have been more appropriate, but the monster has multiple heads, and it is complicated but yet simple to understand.

Me entiendes?

4/30/13

BARRIO EAST SIDE TORRANCE

ESxT is the B'EST

B'EST main heart of the barrio lies off Western Ave between 224th and 227th streets in the Harbor Area

Plaza Del Amo, 224, 225, 226, 227 228, Harvard, Denker and Normadale Park is all Barrio East Side Torrance

B’EST boundaries

(N) 223rd
(S) Sepulveda
(E) Normandie
(W) Western


The original neighborhood started on Menlo Street off of 228th between Vermont, and Figueroa.

B’EST never had any ties to any other neighborhoods period!! Never broke off any other varrio, B’EST is its own original creation.

TxFlats, La Rana, La Loma, Harbor City and Keystone varrios have been around much longer than B'EST and so naturally there is going to be some speculation about ties or breakoffs. But B'EST are no one's rejects, followers, etc. B'EST is the Original neighborhood from East Side Torrance.

B’EST is really within the "Harbor Gateway”. Which is part of L.A., and not City of Torrance proper. And B’EST isnʻt even patrolled by Torrance PD!!! LAPD Harbor Division patrols. Only when LAPD Harbor Division requests assistance, is when Torrance P.D. rolls in.

Varrio Bandana or Color: Straight Blue or Black, and Baby Blue.

Varrio Logo or Lid: Anything with the Carolina Panthers.

B’EST adopted the "Panther" as Thee Varrio symbol. All the Homies sport Panther jerseys and lids. And once you have proven to be a well established solid vato, you can get your Pantera placa tatted on you. Most all the veteranos have it stamped on their left or right forearm. Anyone that's hit the torcida and met B’EST Homies will tell you all the veteranos BʻEST vatos have the Pantera.

The speculation is that the Panther is the same as the Jaguar, and as all Raza knows, the Mayans and Aztecs revered these creatures because of their power and mysteriousness they possessed.

Original Clika: East Side Torrance Peewees, aka Pequenos. From the 1970's thru the late 90's. Still around but have given ground to the younger generations. B’EST has homeboys in their 50's pushing the PWS clika.

2nd Generation Clika: East Side Torrance Diablos. From the late 80's thru the late 90's. Solid B’EST motherfuckers who held down the varrio and stood tall during the 80s and 90s era wars...

3rd Generation Clika: East Side Torrance Lil Raskals. From the late 90's to present times. B’EST newest clika kicking up dust in the varrio and keeping it going strong. The Raskals Clika started after the Homeboy Alejandro" Lil Raskal" Rivera was killed. That was in the late 90's when most everyone from B’EST was away, locked up, in retirement, etc. Lil Raskal was the one recruiting and keeping the varrio going in those days. After he passed, all the little Homies who kicked it with him wanted a clique started after his placaso. They had to earn it and they did.

Some Raza may hear "TORRANCE" and think white people and nice neighborhood. Those same Raza may hear IE or SB and think the same thing. Move my family out there and get away from the "life"..

But BESTrust ~> is down with the business

B'EST don't fuck round !!!

I guess if the varrio was named EAST SIDE HARBOR GATEWAY people would get off the Torrance niceness thing, Que No?

With the times come many changes, and in 2008 la jura got an injunction thrown on little B’EST Varrio.. L.A. City came down hard with the injunction on the Varrio, and ever since they've started building condos and nice apts in and around Plaza Del Amo, so who knows, B’EST might be wiped out by City redevelopment, but never by the enemigas!

B’EST has earned their reputation, and are well known in the Harbor Area, and today the Varrio walks every yard in the pinta.

BARRIO x EASTSIDE x TORRANCE
TILL THE KASKET DROPS

4/5/13

WILMAS 13



WILMINGTON VARRIOS

EAST SIDE WILMAS
WEST SIDE WILMAS
NORTH SIDE WILMAS










THE VATO WEARING THE RED PENDLETON REPRESENTS EAST SIDE WILMAS, AND THE VATO WEARING THE BLUE REPRESENTS WEST SIDE WILMAS. . HYATT AND L STREET IS AT THE HEART OF EAST SIDE WILMAS.. AVALON BLVD DIVIDES ESW FROM WSW.. NORTH OF SEPULVEDA ALONG AVALON BLVD AS YOU HEAD INTO THE RAIL ROAD TRACKS NEIGHBORHOOD AREA THAT DIVIDE WILMAS FROM CARSON CAN BE CONSIDERED NORTH SIDE WILMAS, AND IN THE EAST SIDE ~> GHOST TOWN LIES NORTH OF PACIFIC COAST HIGHWAY. . WILMAS IS ONE OF THE BIGGEST, HARDEST AND OLDEST VARRIOS IN THE HARBOR AREA. . THEY WERE ONCE ONE HUGE VARRIO BUT WITH THE PASSAGE OF TIMES, DIFFERENT STROKES FOR DIFFRENT FOLKS HAVE DIVIDED UP THE VARRIO AND VARRIO UNITY BECAME ALL BUT DEAD.

ONE OF THE OLDEST CLIQUES IN WILMAS IS THE "CHAIN GANG", SOME OF THE REST OF THE ESW WILMAS ARE AS FOLLOWS . . .

L STREET
MAHAR STREET BOYS
HYATT STREET LOCOS
LUMBER YARD MALOS
GHOST TOWN LOCOS
BANNING PARK LOCOS

SOME OF THE WEST SIDE WILMAS CLIKAS ARE . . .
THE OLD C STREET LOCOS AND DANA LOCOS
AND ONE OF THE HARDEST CLIKAS OF ALL WSW TIMES
~> THE WILHALL PARK LOCOS (WHPLS) ALSO KNOWN
AS THE WEST SIDE WILHALL.





THIS OLD ASS PLACASO SHOWS THE EAST SIDE AND WEST SIDE HITTING UP "UNITED". THAT'S HOW THEY WERE NOT TOO LONG AGO . . .

SAD TO HAVE SO MANY WILMAS RAZA FALL VICTIM TO THEIR OWN!

THE SAN PEDRO VERSUS WILMAS RIVALRY IS ONE OF THE OLDEST IN THE HARBOR AREA, BUT THE WSW VERSUS ESW PLEITO HAS BEEN ONE OF THE DEADLIEST BEEFS IN THE SOUTH BAY AMONGST WILMEROS.. THE NORTH SIDE WILMAS VIRTUALLY DISAPEARED BY THE START OF THE EARLY EIGHTIES, BUT I HEAR THEY STILL HAVE HEADS REPRESENTING.. THE ORIGINAL GHOST TOWN LOCOS WERE NOT ALL PART OF ESW., THEY WERE NOT THE SAME GTLS WHICH ARE A CLIKA FROM ESW IN PRESENT TIMES, THEY WERE OTHER VATOS THAT DID NOT ALL CLAIM ESW VARRIO, THEY JUST SIMPLY CLAIMED GHOST TOWN AS THEIR NEIGHBORHOOD GROUNDS AND THEY SHARED THE TURF WITH BOTH EAST SIDE WILMEROS AND WITH THE EAST SIDE PAIN BLOODS WHICH CAN STILL BE FOUND IN THE LAND.. THE WEST SIDE WILMAS WILHALL PARK LOCOS CAME OUT IN THE LATER 70s AND WENT ON TO CREATE A BIG NAME FOR THEMSELVES. WHPLS ARE STILL CARRYING STRONG.. IN THE DANA PROJECTS THE WATERFRONT PIRU’S CLAIMED THEIR SET ALL THRU THE 70s AND 80s UNTIL THE PROJECTS WERE TORN DOWN IN THE 90s.. IN THE LATE 70s AND EARLY 80s THE EAST SIDE WAS KEEPING STRONG WITH THE OLD “L STREET” LOCOS AS THE BACKBONE AND THE MAHAR STREET BOYS AS THE YOUNGER HEAVY FIREPOWER GENERATION. THE MAHAR STREET BOYS HEADQUATERED AT MAHAR AND DENNI STREET, ALL ALONG THE FRONT OF THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL: WITH ONE HUGE CROWD AND A CRAZY ONE AT THAT. THE HYATT STREET LOCOS CAME NEXT IN THE MID EIGHTIES.




^ ^ ^ ^ THIS IS HOW WILMAS BREAKS DOWN . . .

OF COURSE THE DANA STRAND PROJECTS ARE GONE NOW . . .
AND THE GHOST TOWN NEIGHBORHOOD IS NOT WHAT IT ONCE WAS.

RANCHO SAN PEDRO




SAN PEDRO

~~>“HARBOR AREA”

S.P = The Port of L.A.

S.P. flies the flag colors of Black & Gold and the SUR 13 Blue flag.

The Black & Gold comes from the High School football team, the Pirates.

Amongst the lids that S.P. has sported are the Pittsburgh Pirates and the Seattle Mariners, and others like the University of Southern California "SC" lid used by the RSP Santa Cruz Street Locos clique.

The hand signs is a double-handed Big “S” and several others depending on the particular varrio or clique.

The main Varrio is Rancho San Pedro, A.k.a. The Ranch!

The name taken from the Rancho San Pedro housing projects built in the early 1940’s located within the borders of . .

(E) Santa Cruz Street,
(N) Mesa Street,
(S) Harbor Blvd. and
(W) 3rd. Street,

. . centered around Rancho Park on Centre Street & 2nd. Street.
The Rancho San Pedro housing projects together with the Verdes Del Oriente apartments are also home to the Dodge City Crips.
The name Dodge is a mis-translated English equivalent for Rancho that was adopted by the Cuzzins who formed their own gang at the projects in the early to mid 1970’s.
The actual turf claimed by Rancho San Pedro incorporates basically all of San Pedro, south of Cabrillo Street all the way down to the Harbor waterfront..

Rancho San Pedro’s cliques are the following (incomplete list)

NITEOWLS
SANTOS
LOCOS
8TH STREET LOCOS
3RD STREET LOCOS
MIDGETS
16TH STREET LOCOS NUTTY BLOCK
14TH STREET LOCOS
SANTA CRUZ STREET LOCOS
12TH STREET TROUBLES
2ND STREET PROJECTS

The RSP hang outs were many and spread out, never in the same place most of the time. Peck Park, Leland Park, Rancho Park, 2nd Street & Centre, Royal Palms, Point Fermin, Averill Park (The Hole), Cabrillo Beach, Summerland/Rena Park, 12th & Palos Verdes, 16th & Centre or Mesa, 3rd & Cabrillo, Oliver & Center, all of them depending on what was happening out in the streets.



Rancho San Pedro semi-gets along with most other SP Varrios like Varrio Leland Park from the neighborhood north of the Harbor Freeway surrounding the park that carries the same name.

Leland Park old borders are more-or-less the following. .

(S) Gaffey Street
(N) Leland Street
(W) Sepulveda Street
(E) Miraflores Avenue

Their initials are;
LP, LxP, LPSP, LPH, and LPB
Their cliques are:Hoods, Boys and Locos

Leland Park is presumably a break-off from RSP. That area was commonly referred to as the Leland Park Neighborhood, hence the name taken by the Leland Park “HOODS” clique.




RSP also has a love-hate relationship with the olden Park Western Loma Varrio that originated on the hillside ravine off of Western Avenue and Park Western Drive. The PWL original residents lived on the San Pedro hillside facing the Harbor northeast of Leland Park over by Channel Street. These residents were later relocated into the new housing development Channel Heights complex built in 1942, with most of the lower-income residents being pushed into the Housing Projects section called “Western Courts.”

The “Western Courts Projects” were located in the ravine area tucked-in just below Western Avenue and could be accessed through Park Western Drive. The name Park Western Loma was taken off the intersection of (if I remember correctly) Park Western Drive & Park Loma Drive streets that met up right in the middle of the neighborhood.

This neighborhood existed all the way up to 1980 when it was torn down and its residents scattered through-out the Harbor Area. Today, Capitol Drive runs right up the inclined hillside area, and new condominiums line the streets, but in olden times, the Chicano/Mexican community was nitty-gritty looking. There were horse ranches, dirt streets, spooky looking streets and homes, plus the old housing projects in the typical L.A. flats fashion. The streets were real dark and there were also plenty of pristine brush and greenery. The view over the L.A. Harbor below was magnificent, and the many steep dirt paths down the hill many times provided the PWL Homies an escape route from the juras. The place at the end of its days looked like a neighborhood straight out of the 40’s, a lil’ TJ you might say - at least, because the west side of the neighborhood west of Park Western Drive around Peck Park, that part of the neighborhood was very nice looking. Nevertheless, their Varrio was real tight-knit and a happy hood. Folks were friendly and everyone knew each other. La Raza from PWL was made up of both Chicanos & Mexicanos. Peck Park, many times heard referred to by the locals as Park Western was where the Homeboys and their familias would gather up on holidays & occasions. Carne asada, BBQ’s, lowriders, futbol, beisbol, quinceañeras, weddings, or simple weekend kickback, that was their park and that’s were other Raza from San Pedro could come up and get along with each other in peace.

Then came urban redevelopment; city government for many years prior had been working on tearing down the hood. They just could not accept this old Mexican enclave to continue to exist right dead smack in the middle of one of the wealthiest white communities in all of L.A. County. Park Western Loma existed tucked-in between Miraleste, Palos Verdes, Rolling Hills, and the upper middle-class of San Pedro (up the hill as the locals say). No other Varrio bordered PWL. Their closest neighbors were all down hill in Leland Park and Rancho San Pedro. And so, with force of politics and law, the Barrio residents filled with empty promises -- just like the old Chavez Ravine Barrio in Elysian Park -- was destroyed, so too PWL was razed. Its residents scattered through out the Harbor Area. First the projects were torn down, then soon after all the homes, and in their place were erected rows of condo’s and townhouses; well-planned with lit and paved streets. Nothing remained to remind the passer-by of the Barrio that once was; not even the trees nor the natural greens remained. La Raza was not given any chance to move back into the newly built homes; instead, they had to struggle to find a new home for their families. Many moved to other far away places, some to near-by towns like Carson and Longo; anywhere where their economic situation permitted them. Fortunally there were plenty of Homeboys that were able to keep their clan in San Pedro, and these Homies moved down the hill into the main Chicano/Mexican Barrio which back then (1980), was mainly south of Pacific Avenue and predominantly belonged to Rancho San Pedro. There existed in these grounds plenty of other Raza not affiliated with RSP, and with more Raza flowing in on the regular, it made for some interesting times to say the least. Many of these old and newer un-affiliated Raza were constantly met with rejection and hostility by The Ranch, and so too the PWL Homies were faced with instant beef with RSP.

The PWL vatos of them times consisted mainly of the 2 clikas of Malditos & Locos, but within the following year or so, their youngsters created the Chicos clika, the first generation formed outside their original grounds and these Chicos were real Stoners, bien locotes and with a real defiant attitude. Soon thereafter, they began to get it on with the RSP Midgets; then it escalated between the PWL Malditos/Locos and RSP 3RD ST/Locos cliques. Fortunally most of the conflict did not involve fierros, puros putazos y fileros, and that’s because back in them tiempos, an un-written rule of no cuetes between S.P. Raza was observed by most. Even though things would heat up between some, nevertheless there were always others from both sides who worked hard to cool things off; beef would die down somewhat or pleitos with out-of-town varrios would unite S.P. raza against their common enemies like Wilmas or Harbor City.

All the S.P. Varrios and raza Locos never have actually bonded together to fight as one, they all just simply do their own dirt. Some harder than others, some caught up and forced into action, others acting on opportunity, but with many remaining true to the cause.

During those early 1980’s many PWL vatos (not all) began to kick it together with the SPLS (San Pedro Locos) and in particular with some of those who had started up the “Barrio San Pedro” V’BSP’R who were holding up a whole two street section of the RSP projects where Beacon Street and Third Street met, just two blocks south of the DCC Mob & RSP Locos on Second Street & Centre.

BSP consisted of a motley crew of Cholos, Stoners, Bikers & Paisas. All those who either were rejected by The Ranch or by those who refused to join RSP for whatever personal reasons. BSP was kick-started by a combination of people’s, but the main protagonists came from an olden S.P. Car Club called Los “UNITEDS” which was formed in 1973 by several old-school familias of brothers and primos from S.P.. . These older vatos never much cared about gang-banging and shit, and they were mostly about fixing up their ranflas, getting stoned on yesca and partying in the true spirit of San Pipas. Since these older vatos were also “futbolistas y guanteros”, nobody really fucked with them, but the changing times kept creeping up on them and soon, more and more raza was found revolving around them; their carnalitos came of age and then came some vatos who were mas locos whom at the same time did not carry the same weight or respect like the older vatos.



Before you knew it, the newer Raza and these youngsters from the Uniteds started up their own gang in response to pressure from The Ranch. These vatos had a decent attitude towards anyone who was cool people and it did not really matter to which San Pedro crowd they belonged to or what clika they claimed. Many of the San Pedro Locos and Park Western Loma Homeboys soon gravitated towards this motley crew and even more than a few vatos from RSP joined their ranks.

BSP ranks grew by the day with many gente closing ranks with them. The vast majority of non-BSP simply chose to get along with them. The BSP vatos got along well with the LP Boys and no beef ever sparked off between them, and when PWL moved down the hill, these vatos from BSP & PWL were an instant brotherhood. Both these groups had the same problems, and both these groups seemed to carry the same attitude towards “La Vida Loca” and the local street politics, so while the Rancheros and the Crips on Second Street were handling their business, the BSP, PWL & SPLS handled theirs down the street.

Not all PWL vatos were that firme with BSP, but those that were soon started up plaqueando under one roll-call with BSP and they began striking up like one big clika as “BSPWL” 3RD STREET. Their block down the street was always jammin’ and it rivaled that on 2ND ST held by the DCC Mob & RSP.

BSPWL down on 3 RD & Beacon was always happening; the block would be packed all the time and the crowd got so huge that the 2ND Streeters, mainly the Cuzzins eventually came to the conclusion that it was best to co-exist than to be rumbelling with each other. The Cuzzins would score their yesca from the Mexicans and the Mexicans would score their juice from the Cuzzins.

Then the rock begings to make a real impact and the raza Bikers from S.P. kicked-it up a notch with the acido y los Paisas go heavy pushing that black tar and ice. The vatos from Santa Cruz re-introduced La Carga and bam! Now everyone was on a trip, tempers flared up, hot summer nights adding to the numbers out in the streets, short fuses and uneasy minds, the whole damn Harbor Area seemed to explode into warfare all at once. San Pedro, WS Wilmas, ES Wilmas, Carson, TxFlats, Barrio Pobre, KeyStone, Victoria Park, Gardena, everyone was out gunning for someone, still the partying continued every week while bodies kept dropping.

Enter Raza activists like End Barrio Warfare, Barrios Unite and local Veteranos whom start mediating and setting up juntas between the battling camps. They sponsored gatherings at pre-arranged parks and meetings on neutral grounds began to take place. Enemy Varrios meeting up to play beisbol, futbol con refin y birrias began to take place. The Homeboys are encouraged to bring their familias and many do so. The madness amongst some calms down some, but not all vatos attend, nevertheless firme gente is plentyfull while others carry on . . and in San Pedro? History continues on the making.

The DCC Mob & Rancheros semi-alliance breaks down and the whole shit on Second Street takes a turn for the worse. BSPWL reach their fullest, seems like they grew so quickly, adding so many to their confederation that their differences and loyalties between them went unnoticed. No real unification ever occurred and they whole scene breaks down. PWL never really goes on the recruiting, while more of their vatos keep moving out, out of town and out of state.

BSP breaks down, the clikas they had incorporated like the original Santa Cruz Locos (Guayabos) and the 11TH Locos turn towards RSP. The youngsters from Santa Cruz go on to become the RSP Santa Cruz Sreet Locos in the later 1980’s, and the 11TH Street locos merge with RSP 12TH Street; amongst those are some from S.C. ST. . . RSP’s Midgets mostly disappear, and their small short-timers 14 Sreeters clika also disappear. . Leland Park also stops recruiting and somewhat disappears, but being that their hood remains, they continue on, small but still around.. RSP then begins to loosen up on it’s recruiting policy, and more and more raza begins to claim RSP. Before you know it, everyone and their cousin is claiming Rancho.

The years go by and everyone who claimed BSP or PWL get’s torcido, OD’s, commits suicide, gets smoked or turns hypo, the rest calls it quits and fade away in the general scene. Even the big ass RSP 3RD ST clika with it’s dominance over the grounds by the YMCA dies down big time, having suffered many casualties to the same reasons; and their customary out in the open show of numbers and faces jumps in with the low-profile new times. This is where I leave it at . . . more S.P. drama would be nice to learn up on, but maybe it is best to leave the most current news from the hood out; maybe for another time in the future, on account that the entrance by Young Crowd, Calle Oliver, PJS Locos and the rest of the internal problems between some RSP clikas, still somewhat touch on delicate homegrounds issues, besides that “I’m out of the loop”!!! Which is another way of saying "I don't know what the fuck"!!!

This was part of the scene in San Pedro during the later 1970's and early 1980's.


To be continued . . .


The PoolHalls - on Pacific Avenue between 1st Street & Santa Cruz

The Car Wash - at Pacific Avenue & Sepulveda

Peck Park (PWL Park) - off of Western Avenue & Summerland

Leland Park (LPSP)- off of Summerland overlooking Gaffey Street & the 110 Freeway

Cabrillo Beach – off of Pacific Avenue, down 36th street

Royal Palms – down the cliff off of Paseo Del Mar

Point Fermin Park (The Lighthouse) – Gaffey & Paseo Del Mar

Sunken City – down the “cliffside” of Point Fermin Park

Angels Gate (The Lookout) – at the end of Gaffey & overlooking the town and the Pacific Ocean

Daniels Field – home of the PIRATES between 12th & 13th streets on Cabrillo Avenue

Parke De La Ocho / 8th Street Playground (Wino Park) on Mesa and 8 th Street

The Projects (RSP) – (N) Mesa Street, (E) Santa Cruz Street, (S) Harbor Blvd. (W) Third Street

Rancho Park (DCC) - at 2nd Street & Centre Street

Tobberman’s – at Santa Cruz & Grand Avenue

Averill Park (Stoner Park) aka The Hole – at 13th Street & Averill Park Drive

Friendship Park (The Top) – overlooking all of San Pedro & the Harbor off of 9th Street on Friendship Park Drive

Harbor Park – on Beacon Street between 7th Street & 13th Street overlooking Harbor village (Port’s-O-Call Village)

Spiro’s Burgers – on Pacific Avenue and 3rd Street

PWL Projects - (torned down) - off Western Avenue down the cliff off Park Western Drive. (Now fully redeveloped with Capitol Drive running through it)

These were the main gathering places and crusing spots to congregate at, but by no means the "individual clikas hangouts" - Each clika had its own spots, but those mentioned above were the spots that all could come together and party hardy. Pacific Avenue was the crusin' Avenue for all and there were several dance halls to kick it as well, such as the Dancing Waters, The Aquarium and the Army Hall.

VIVA SAN PEDRO!