2/11/13

VARRIO SAN YSIDRO





San Ysidro's early urban development came from a visionary group of people who came to settle in the valley in 1909 and founded an agricultural utopian colony called "Little Landers." This group of people, in communion with their Mexican neighbors appropriately, christened their community with the name of the patron saint of farmers, ISIDRO, "a virtuous farmer who had fallen asleep and had his fields plowed for him by angels."

Varrio San Ysidro aka “SIDRO” from the community which carries the same name is located in the southern most part of the City of San Diego, adjacent to the international border with Tijuana (Tijuas) Baja Califas.

San Ysidro is a community that is both a small town and bustling city; a gateway between Mexico and Califas. More than a century of settlement and development makes San Ysidro a changing community, yet one which still retains a village atmosphere. Many architectural and cultural qualities from different periods of its evolving history have been retained and are captured in this neighborhood. San Ysidro began as an agricultural experiment to preserve a rural agricultural/farm lifestyle, but now has emerged as a multicultural area attempting to maintain its sense of community. Some areas of the Barrio are characterized by real-olden homes with well-tended gardens where las familias know their vecinos, while newer urban tracts of homes and ever increasing apartment complexes continue to add into the mix of residents.

Varrio San Ysidro is bounded in the east by the hills and canyons below Otay Mesa. To the west is the Tijuana River Valley, a vast wetlands area that reaches as far west to the Pacific Ocean. To the south is the International border; Tijuana on the other side of La Linea (The Fence). Bordering on the north side is the 905 Freeway which separates Sidro from the communities of Nestor/Otay. These natural and man-made boundaries have served the Varrio well over time in helping it to keep its unique identity; however the cohesion of this community over the decades, has been fragmented by the construction of Interstates (5), (805), (905) and the San Diego trolley.

San Ysidro’s Mexican roots and ties with Tijuana have from the onset been real strong. There can never be any question about the ties-that-bond both sides of the border in this here town. From its early history of ranchos and farms, to the turn of the century Little Landers Colony experiment; continuing thru the 1920’s and onto the 1930’s when Mexicans began to increase dramatically in numbers and into the 1940s when Sidro became the gateway to the bustling party town of Tijuas. Tijuana with its nightlife, its gambling, its racetrack and oceanfront beaches, attracted more than a just few people from American & Californian society. Amongst the throngs of people coming down to party-hardy, so too entered the Pachucos and they introduced their Gangster stilo. These Chucos --Tarzanes as they were called down on the Mexican Side, so much influenced the young jente in Tijuas, that their style survived even up to the late 60s/early 70s. In SY, they left their impact as well, and the Young Raza from Sidro being no different than the rest, joined up in the style and created their own Pachuco Club.

The “COACHMEN” the first clika from SIDRO.

The Coachmen began their life as an un-official car-club in the very early 1950s. The Barrio in those days was very much all-along San Ysidro Blvd. in particular, further to the west side --west of today’s 805 freeway-- stretching all the way to Dairy Mart Road. The COACHMEN cruised with their coches (ranflas) all up and down LA VILLA as the strip was called in-between Via de San Ysidro and Dairy Mart Road. Most of the neighborhood Vatos (some 50 in those days) worked and kicked it at the empacadoras (the packing plants) also on the strip, over by where SY Blvd and Dairy Mart Road meet. By the late 50s, these Vatos had become straight-up a “VARRIO” in all sense of the meaning, and at the start of the 60s, their second generation “Los ENANOS” took their place.

During the 1950/60s, the population increased big time and the Barrio kept growing. Soon, the slicing up of the community began. The construction of Interstate 5 cut off Calle Primera and the southern part of the old neighborhood, splicing it off from the rest of the community.

Then in 1964, the 805 spliced it up again right down the middle, creating what today is called East & West SY Blvd; thus, cutting off the oldest part of the neighborhood straddling the Rail Road tracks closest to La Colonia Libertad of Tijuana.

Businesses and new housing development sprang up everywhere. The southern part of the neighborhood, south of Calle Primera, became a smugglers paradise. Laying right next to the then wide-open countryside and swamplands --next to the then still non-built Tijuana River-levee-- and the dairy's/horse ranches below the pristine hillsides, canyons and ravines in the notorious “Badlands." This whole area became the most contested grounds between La Migra & La Raza ever; all up to the time when Operation Gatekeeper built up their border protection system of cameras, motion sensors and La Tortillera (the ugliest-looking sheet-metal high-fence ever built).

The tract along Camino De La Plaza was built up with commercial malls and the Park Haven Apartment complex came to existence in-between those shopping plazas and Larson Field --later re-named Cesar Chavez Community Center. The Park Haven Apartment complex still stands today. A two block low-income housing place that was notoriously known as the half-way houses between runs across the Badlands.

On the north side of the I-5, the Barrio continued to grow around the Library and Community Center located on East & West Park Ave. This area became the heart of the Barrio and remains so onto these present times. It is in this turf that the next generations of SY clikas sprung-up in the 1970s.

The 70s saw an explosion in Raza. Crowds of Raza were everywhere. Up by the hills above Beyer Blvd over by Del Sur Blvd, the VILLA NUEVA apartment complex was built in 1970. The residents who had been displaced by the never-ending build-up and re-development, were given first crack at the units. This place has all the looks of a typical housing-projects complex, and back in the 70s, La Raza in these grounds got together and formed the clika VILLA LOCOS.

The VLS kicked it at THE LANE --present day Athey Ave.-- at the Vista Terrace Park overlooking the ravine running along the then 117 Highway --which later became the 905 Fwy. This ravine was semi-wild country and it separates Sidro from Varrio Del Sol on the other side of the road.

When the 905 was built in 1975 along this same route, it broke-off another chunk of SY to the northwest along Iris Avenue. This area around Southwest Junior H.S. gave birth for a short-stint to the VARRIO IRIS AVENUE (VIA).

During the mid-to-late 70s, the LOCOTES clika sprung up in the Park Ave neighborhood. During this time-era, the Surfo (Stoner) stilos came of age on both sides of The Fence. Cholo & Surfo gangs exploded in Tijuas, and in San Ysidro the young crowds of Raza, --which many have always kept up ties with families south of the border—their Surfo counterparts also staked claim to hang-out spots in Sidro. The SY PUNKS surfaced during these years; then LOS BIKERS (both Surfo crowds). The SY Punks gradually fell in-line with the Cholo stile and joined up with SYR. Los Bikers used to hang around where today’s Beyer Blvd Trolley Station exist today on Beyer and Cottonwood Road. They adopted their name from the simple fact that their members all had those old-school 16 inch spoke wheels bikes. At the turn of the 80s when the Trolley system was built in 1981, their spot was razed and with the Surfo stile becoming a dying breed, it didn’t take long for them to disappear from the scene. Nevertheless, some from Los Bikers joined the main SY ranks.

With the arrival of the 80s decade, new clikas were formed.
In the mid-80's the SY GANGSTERS formed up and kicked it at The Alley (Cypress Dr.) behind West Park Ave in the street-alley where it meets up with Blanche Street.
The LOCOTES clika continued-on, but they took up a spot further north on Cypress, up the next block where it dead ends with the Trolley tracks.
The VILLA LOCOS continued staying up as well, but their numbers were greater on the north side of the tracks.

By the mid-to-late 80s, the LIL LOCOS clika sprang up, sponsored by the LOCOTES, and then the TINY LOCOS, followed up by Los MALOS in the 1990s.

By the 1990s, all the SYR clikas were inter-mixed. They kicked it here there and everywhere. The MALOS began to make more of presence on the south side of the 5 Freeway over by Sycamore/Larsen Field as well as the LOCOTES. The TINY LOCOS remained closer to the center of the Barrio along the community center, even so, all the clikas continue to hang-out together.

Hitting the mid-decade of this new millennia, a new clika is on the making; youngsters calling themselves “BOYS,” but they’re yet to be confirmed, last heard of.

This History of VARRIO SAN YSIDRO is one pieced together here and there, therefore if I’m off on some or anyone can share better info, by all means

~~> spit it out.
“I’m more than interested” . . .
By LONEWOLF

48 comments:

BOOZE said...

Ke chingon, finally the hood is in cyberspace! Viva SY'LTS X3 el CHANGO!saludos a mis homies RHINO TLS,lil PUPPET, PORCEL, AZTEKA, JESSE, PRIMO y al perdido del JERRY AKA el PLAYER! Nothing but good times!

Anonymous said...

THATS RIGHT SIDRO MUDAFUCKAS!

Anonymous said...

thatss right!!!!!!!!!!!

Anonymous said...

Some of the history of Sidro cliques is incorrect. My time in the hod was from the mid 70's to the mid-80s. My klika was the Enanos Locos. I will send an email with the chronological order of clicas, you missed a few.

Teco SY ELS

Anonymous said...

Sidro homies were also written about in the book:

Gangbangs and Drive-Bys: Grounded Culture and Juvenile Gang Violence by William B. Sanders - 1994

I was in communitty college in '94 and I was in the library, I saw this book opened it up and was reading. Imagine my surprise when I was reading about my homies and of activities where I actually had been.

It would be great if a link to the book can be posted in the blog.

El Teco loco
Sidro Enanos Locos

Anonymous said...

ORALE HOW'S THAT SIDRO LIFE LIKE FUCKIN HATERZ THIS IS CAPPER REPRESENTANDO FUCK ALL OUR ENEMIGAS ESETHIS IS MOTHAFUCKIN SIDRO GANG TO ALL YOU BITCHES!DN'T WEAR IT OUT AND EP IT OUT YOUR FUCKIN MOUTH LEVAS AL RATO!

Anonymous said...

whats up im 2nd generation from sidro, my jefe and me will be anonymous on here, but my jefe kicked it with veteranos like ... loco, pecas, gato, mosco, and many other og's who didnt make it this far like ... smokey, yoyo, and big porras. i grew up with looney from tls (rip) , chubbs, spider, and i want to say whats up to all the sidrenos inside and out, alive or dead, sidro is one of the oldest hoods in sd, we gotta keep it strong, homies who make it gotta come back and help the younger generations, pigs are deep as fuck in sidro, we got to help each other.

Anonymous said...

Arriva San Ysidro A todos los homies
ViaLS and Tiny locos. Rest in Peace to all the surenos(soldados) from San Ysidro Gang GTS,TLS,LTS,VLS, EXTREMLY VIOLENT CREW 522.

Anonymous said...

IT'S ALL ABOUT SIDRO!!!!

Anonymous said...

SAN YSIDRO BE THAT CRASY GANG HOMIE THAT I BE CLAIMING, IF YOU DONT ALREADY KNOW HOMIE ITS THAT MALOS CLICK THAT BE BANGING HOMEBOY. THEY HATE US CAUSE THEY CANT BE US. GONE
AINT NO SURENO LIKE A SIDRENO........

VCV GST said...

Varrio Chula Vista G street Ese Baby Tripper! Respecto to San Ysidro especially the villa locos(my dad was from the villa)

Anonymous said...

Boxer, are you a girl? Were you in the O class at SW Jr?

Anonymous said...

1887 - New towns appeared in the south bay area during the boom..The border towns of Tia Juana (on the American side) and Tijuana (on the Mexican side) began to flourish during this boom era. Merchants such as Joseph Messenger, Alejandro Savín and Felipe Crosthwaite developed the tourist trade by offering horse races and bullfights in the Mexican town. An agreement of July 12, 1889, ended the land dispute among the Arguellos, and Antonio Arguello sold land for the subdivision of Zaragoza de Tijuana. In the 1920s Alberto Arguello leased the Agua Caliente hot springs to an investor group headed by Baja Gov. Rodriguez, who opened the great Agua Caliente Resort in 1928 with a casino, hotel, and spa, soon joined by a race track, golf course, aviary, radio station, and airport.

1908 - Little Landers was the name of a short-lived cooperative farming colony founded by William E. Smythe in the Tia Juana Valley. Smythe was the publisher of the San Francisco magazine "Little Lands in America" that promoted a back-to-the soil movement where everyone owned their own small one-acre plot of land. Their slogan was "A little land and a living..." Smythe led a company that purchased for $15,000 the remnants of the township of Tia Juana that had been wiped out by the flood of 1891. The Little Landers tract of 550 acres included 150 in the Tia Juana Valley bottom, and 400 on the slope of the north hill. The experimental community began to decline after the Hatfield flood destroyed property and crops of 100 families of the colony on Jan. 18, 1916. During the prohibition 1920's it became a border community for employees of the racetracks and bars in the boom town of Tijuana, and evolved into the community of San Ysidro, named in honor of the Spanish patron saint of farming.

Anonymous said...

HISTORY OF SAN YSIDRO

The settlement, growth and development of San Ysidro revolves around its proximity to the United States/Mexico border and its status as a border crossing. As such, perhaps the most significant date in San Ysidro’s history is 1848. In that year, the United States and Mexico concluded the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo which created the International Border we acknowledge today. The first settlement in San Ysidro was a Spanish trading post established in 1818 and named for the patron saint of agriculture, Saint Isidore. The name “San Ysidro” is especially appropriate because a portion of San Ysidro lies in the rich valley between Otay Mesa to the east and the mountains to the south. This agricultural area proved to be fertile farmland and an impetus for early development in the region. William Smythe, a San Diego booster and historian, founded the present day townsite of San Ysidro in 1909. Smythe carefully selected the area as the location for his agricultural colony, the Little Landers. This unique settlement flourished from 1909-1916. Residents lived by the motto, “A Little Land and A Living,” which expressed the colony’s primary goal—that a family could sustain itself, and even prosper, by intensively farming just one acre of land. Smythe's followers purchased lots in the newly platted town, built houses and began to farm.

The Little Landers weathered the initial lack of water and public facilities, the 1911 Flores Magon Revolution, a series of battles between the Federal government of Mexico and rebel forces in Tijuana, and bandit raids in Tecate which caused some residents to consider leaving the settlement. Many residents were able to sell surplus produce in San Diego. Although not prosperous, the colonists were living proof of the feasibility of Smythe’s theory, that one acre of land could support a family. Little Landers Colony Number One had almost become a permanent fixture in the South Bay when disaster struck. The so-called Hatfield Flood in January 1916 destroyed the homes, livestock and household possessions of one hundred families, all of them Little Landers. These settlers were left penniless because all of their capital was in the land (underneath water). The colony was unable to recover from such a blow, and many of the original residents sold their holdings to the employees of the newly established Sunset Racetrack, south of the border, and non-participants in the Little Landers experiment. Almost overnight, San Ysidro became a tent city that accommodated a sudden influx of employees who traveled to work across the border. By World War I, San Ysidro’s dependence upon border commerce was well established. The closing of the border crossing for one year during the war had a crippling effect upon the little town’s economy. When the border reopened, the U.S. was in the midst of Prohibition and Americans involved in the sale of alcohol flocked to Mexican border towns and opened saloons. Customers followed to patronize these establishments. Once again, San Ysidro became home to the employees of businesses across the border. Although still a predominantly agricultural region, tourist and gambling interests began to play an increasingly important role in the economy.
In contrast to the growing metropolis across the border, San Ysidro strived to maintain its small town atmosphere. Locals established community-serving businesses, such as hardware and feed stores and lumberyards along San Ysidro Boulevard, the community’s main thoroughfare. The town’s economy continued to prosper, however, due to the tourist. The opening of Agua Caliente Racetrack in Mexico in 1929 served only to increase tourist traffic through San Ysidro.

Despite all of this, San Ysidro, like many small agricultural communities, was severely affected by the Great Depression and was devastated in 1933, when President Cardenas of Mexico seized and nationalized all foreign-owned businesses. American investors withdrew all their money from Tijuana and San Ysidro and fled the region. The border was left to its own resources, which without tourists, were few. San Ysidro resumed its identity as a sleepy agricultural village. The advent of World War II dramatically changed the face of San Ysidro. In 1942, due to the shortage of manpower, United States farmers convinced the federal government to initiate the Bracero Program. This allowed thousands of Mexicans to work in the United States legally for a limited time. The homogeneous settlement of early San Ysidro experienced a cultural transformation as many Mexicans crossed the border to participate in the Bracero Program. The expiration date of the legislation was extended, and extended again, until 1964. Meanwhile, many Mexican farm workers remained, sent for their families and settled in the area.

San Ysidro’s proximity to Mexico and its strong Hispanic heritage are among the community's greatest resources. Although San Ysidro originally grew as a small, quiet border community in an agricultural setting, it is also the location of the busiest International Border crossing in the world. In many respects, San Diego and Tijuana constitute a single, large metropolitan area; the border is only a partial barrier to communication and exchange between the two cities. The community lies at the crossroads between the two cities and has important relationships with both. San Ysidro’s location adjacent to Mexico provides opportunities for the development of a center of cultural exchange and commerce serving both the tourist and the resident population. In addition, the strong interpersonal support which exists in the Hispanic family creates a tightly knit community. San Ysidro’s location and its ethnic heritage, however, also present the community with its greatest challenges such as border traffic congestion, the language barrier and sub-standard socio-economic levels.

Anonymous said...

BIG BAD NESTOR GANG !! just letting u know dogg that u forgot about our varrios clicks ! the first NESTOR generation was NTR locos. back in the days the older homies use to abreviate NESTOR as NTR. than later on it became "NST" or "NSTR" and they started using 19street on thier placasos, 19th st was the name of the calle where the "NESTOR APTS" are before the city changed it to saturn blvd. so it was NESTOR 19th STREET aka NST19ST. than the chicos came up in the 80s but they kept using 19th street in thier placasos so it was NESTOR 19ST CHICOS(CHS)"NST19STCHS13" around that same time the homegirls from the varrio started thier own click, the "lokas".later in the 90s a new generation came up, the "youngsters" aka the "ygsboys" this is the newest click that are still around patrolling the neighborhood. all the clicks still use "19str" in thier placasos even though 19street is now saturn blvd but its always gonna be NINETEEN STREET to us bcus thats the heart of the neighborhood.

Anonymous said...

FUK ALL DA ENEMIGAS VARRIO SAN YSIDRO RIFA..FUK PUTAY, DOG SHIT,NALGA CITY, FLAMIN HOT,CHESNUTZ,.....
SAN YSIDRO LOKOTES 1925.MOTHAFUKAS!!

Anonymous said...

THATS RIGHT FUCK ALL OUR ENEMIGAS! HOMIE! BABYDOLL REPRESENTING THAT BIG BADD ASS SAN YSIDRO GANG!

Lonewolf said...

The South San Diego community of San Ysidro will celebrate its 100th anniversary of its founding with a free public festival expected ... Saturday, May 16, at the San Ysidro Athletic Center's Larsen Field, 4100 Camino De La Plaza... Right there by Sycamore.

100 AñOS!!! QUE VIVA SIDRO!!!

PRIMO said...

Shot out's to everyone from the sycamore block! VIVA MI VARRIO SAN YSIDRO! What up my brothers BIG JESS, SUSTO, CHIVY, And all my TRUE HOMIES!!! U know who you are! TINYMASLOKOTES RIFA!!!!!!!!!!!!

Anonymous said...

PURO SIDRO! FUCK THE REST!! SO BEWARE OF THE VILLA LOCOS PATROLING THEIR TERRITORY:
KLEVER
LARGO
REAPER
THEFT
CLUMSY
LIL CLUMSY
SCANDAL
SCOOBY
TOONS
GANGSTER
FELON
THUMPS
* RIP HATE *

Anonymous said...

fuck putay and the river bitches is all about the crassy ass Varrio San Ysidro malos 13 Gang !!!!! fuck our enemigas much love and respect for all the clickas in the Varrio Y's Up homies this Big Tiros from the MLS click "SYR" por vida.

Lonewolf said...

'sup with all the writing on the walls from SIDRO lately? Been seeing hit up all over the planet.. looks like the work of one or two young homies, but dang, you vatos be spraying everywhere.. i'm all for letting it be known who's up and claiming the varrio, but if you're going to write on the walls, then at least have some skills and pick a good spot to throw up a placaso, and don't just scribble anywhere.. have a little more respect and taste for where you hit up.. and when you do, make it look nice.. not that shysty stuff i been seeing all over!

Anonymous said...

What up too all my boys from the big. Bad SIDRO GANG this GIZMO SY MLS. KRASY ass gang foo and fuck the rest......

Lonewolf said...

Question for all you SIDRO vatos.. how come VLS & LTS always be hitting up together, but MLS hit up by themselves?

Anonymous said...

SAN YSIDRO LIL ONES!!!

Anonymous said...

I'm not from sidro but I grew up in these crazy streets! San Ysidro what? San Ysidro R!Fa..

Maria Diaz said...

ESa CHaTz

Jerry Mendoza said...

Mr.jerry boy SanYsidro Locotes Gang !!!! Qvoo..

Jerry Mendoza said...

Qonda homie is Locote Jerry , how u been carnal???

Anonymous said...

I live my life in SIDORO VIVA PURO SIDORO Shout out to my homeboys Scarface
From JV

Anonymous said...

Viva SY los numero 1

Anonymous said...

Don't forget the homie Midget RIP, and the homies Tallboy, Termite, and Muppet from the VillaLs

Anonymous said...

Generation-wise we are more close in age. Answer your question? SYR all day

lil bandit .sy said...

Que onda Pinche jerry soy yo el lil bandit just looking at this pedo and thought I'd send you y a todos los camaradas from that big ese igriega gang orale pues hometown te cuidas y saludame a tu ruca

Anonymous said...

Big Bad Sydro X3!!! R3pr3s3nting all the way from TORR3ON COAHUILA M3XICO:. BIG SHOUT OUT TO MY HOM3 BOY BIG M3X UP IN FLORIDA!!! ALWAY3S R3PR3S3NTIG SY 13 TO TH3 FULL3ST!!

Anonymous said...

vSIDRO"LOKOS"GANG

Anonymous said...

Big Bad Sidro Lts

Anonymous said...

B1G 1925 GANG LTS CLICK

Anonymous said...

B1G SHOUT OUT TO ALL THE LOCOTES AND THE GANGSTERS CLICK B SAN YSIDRO GANG SUR DIEGO!!!!!

Anonymous said...

Wussss up I grew up w the LIL ONES....NYONE NO WERE DOPEY B AT....HOW BOUT SNAKE FROM VILLA LOKOS....ND LEFTY I TNK HES A LOKOTE....Y LA LIL TRIPPS....SM ONE UPDATE ME

CLUMSY said...

EsA CLuMSY X92V.:

CLUMSY said...

EsA CLuMSY X92V.:

Anonymous said...

FUCK THE MALAS THERE ALL BITCHES SAN YSIDRO IS OURS NOW BITCHES THIS BE BIG BAD PALM CITY FH LS X3 LIL GRIFØ

Anonymous said...

VARRIO SAN YSIDRO MALOS 131219 FUCK THE REST SALUDOS TO ALL HOMEGirlS AND HOMIES FROM THE NEIGHBORHOOD THIS ISSS T??Ko#1

Juan Remato said...



Orale Teco,
Pues The Enanos were established at larsen park during the fiestas patrias of 1975. The homeboy, Que En Paz Descanse,Joker Sidro Chicos ask us who were around 12-13 what we we were gonna name our clika. If I remember right estaba El Chato, Lil Payaso, Hano, Trigger, Bule, Wino, Big Popeye RIP, and yours truly. Dispensa if I forgot anyone. I met you in 1979 when I had paroled from YA.
Orale,
El Johnny Boy SYEL'S

Anonymous said...

SIDRO LTS

CAFETERO 100% said...

sending my love and respeto to all the firmes camaradas from SIDRO, FROM LENTO SAN YSIDRO MALOS X3

CAFETERO 100% said...

sending my love and respeto to all the firmes camaradas from SIDRO, FROM LENTO SAN YSIDRO MALOS X3