7/28/13

VARRIO EAST SIDE CLOVER


EAST SIDE CLOVER
Initials: ESC, C19, CST
213 Area Code
Bandana Color: GREEN
Logo: THE 3 LEAF SHAMROCK, aka LUCKY CLOVER.
The plant most often referred to as shamrock is the clover and has served as a good luck symbol since the earliest times.
Hand sign: Big C (Pending Art)

The Varrio is from the later 1920s or early 1930s.
1950s Car Club: Thee Phantoms
Original clique: Leprechauns (Duendes)
Later cliques: Jokers, Tiny Jokers, Calle Sichel Locos, 19 Street (Avenue 19),

Irish and Mexicans where the first membership, but as the years went by, it became predominantly Italian and Mexican. But today, even though there still remains a sizable Italian population in Clover Heights, the Mexican/Chicano population by far supplies the majority of members to the Varrio ranks. Varrio name origin stems from: CLOVER STREET proper; obviously named because the Irish first settled in Clover Heights or possibly from the large clover fields which existed there. Clover fields and wild mustard grew rampantly in those early times.

The EAST SIDE part of the Varrio name stems from the fact that when this section of greater East Los Angeles became officially renamed Lincoln Heights in 1917, as endearing as the new name was to become, it was still common for residents to refer to their neighborhood as “The East Side.” To this day, when older residents talk about The Heights, they’ll often say ~> “You know, The Eastside.” Even the old LAPD quarters located by the Five Points (the intersection of Pasadena Avenue, Avenue 26 and Daly Street), was known as the East Side Police Station, until the Police Commission in 1919 changed the name to Lincoln Heights Police Station, so as to reflect on official records.

Another remnant of the name “Eastside” was the Eastside Brewery, which then became Pabst/Eastside Brewery, then Pabst Blue Ribbon Brewery, and in present times referred to solely as The Brewery. This is where the locals got their cold long neck bottles of “Eastside Beer”, it was really good stuff and cheap too.

The Old Clover Street community was bounded by the railroad on the south, the L.A. River on the west, North Broadway to the north, and EastLake (Lincoln Park) on the east. It was a close-knit community and everyone knew everyone else. Officially, the Varrio East Side Clover, as well as the Varrios of East Lake 13, Happy Valley, Rose Hills, East Side 18 Street and Varrio Lincoln Heights are all located within the greater Lincoln Heights district surrounding Lincoln Park, aka East Lake. But CLOVER itself is located in an enclave that was oldenly known as Clover Heights which stretched from North Broadway, all the way along the East Side of the LA River, south to the vineyards and railyards.
NORTH BROADWAY was formerly DOWNEY Avenue, renamed in 1910, it stretched from the LA river to Mission Rd. Named after John Gately Downey an Irish Catholic pharmacist who had served as the 7th governor of California from 1860 to 1862; In 1874 Downey Avenue was a 100 foot long street bisecting “The Eastside.” Since almost all horse car and cable lines were conceived to promote land development, Downey’s partner John Griffin began running a used omnibus along Downey Avenue to promote local home sites.
North Broadway (Downey) became a busy commercial strip, which it remains today. This is where the heart of CLOVER HEIGHTS was established. Clover Heights is one of the oldest neighborhoods in Los Angeles, dating back to the 1870s. Perched on bluffs above the L.A. River, it was originally home to some of the city’s wealthiest residents, who built a large number of Victorian mansions in the district (many of which can still be seen standing today as you stroll through the neighborhood). By the turn of the Twentieth Century, however, the rapid industrial development along the riverbanks made it less appealing for wealthy Angelinos, who then began to move out to other areas, first to the Arroyo Seco area, then from the 1920s on, to the rapidly developing Mid-Wilshire area. As the wealthy residents moved out, Clover Heights became home to a large Italian population as well as an ever greater Mexican population. It and its cross-river neighbor “Little Italy” (what is now Chinatown) formed the heart of the Southern Califas Italian-American community. But beginning just after World War II, Italians and Mexicans alike began to also move out from the immediate areas next to the River. This process accelerated during the 1950s, with the construction of the Golden State Freeway running parallel to the river, which split the Clover Barrio right down the middle and devastated the neighborhood. Ever since, Clover Heights has been a poor-to-working class Chicano neighborhood.
In present times, The Heights can roughly be considered to be bordered by the Los Angeles River on the west, the San Bernardino I-10 Freeway on the south, and Soto Street on the east; the district's northern border is unclear due to the area's uneven terrain. Adjacent communities include El Sereno on the east, City Terrace on the southeast, Boyle Heights on the south, Dog Town and Solano Canyon on the west, Cypress Park on the northwest, Mount Washington on the north and Montecito Heights on the northeast (The Hills, as the area is referred to by the locals).

Originally the CLOVER STREET neighborhood was founded by a growing affluent class which chose to move away from the hustle and bustle of downtown LA. Griffin Avenue was named after one of the founders and investors in the area. Other streets such as Workman and Sichel were also named after original settlers. Around the 1930s the immediate area surrounding the old barrio became a working class neighborhood adjacent to the EastSide Brewery and the San Antonio Winery on North Main and Lamar Streets.

Back then, there were houses between the brewery and the LA River which separated Barrio Clover from Dog Town on the other side. The Clover Street Barrio was a close-knit community and everyone knew everyone else. Houses were seldom locked. Of course not everyone was rich with material things and there was really no reason to lock anything. Nevertheless, if you had a bike, it was prudent to lock and secure it at night. Although protected by natural boundaries, outsiders may sometimes wander through the streets at night. Albion Street Elementary School was nearly at the center of the community, which made a short walk for all of its students. It was one of the first schools to be built in the city of Los Angeles in 1891 opening a year later. The wooden schoolhouse was initially on Albion St, but later new classrooms were added and the administrative offices were moved to Avenue 18. But, it still retained the original name. Many of the young Clover Boys that graduated from Albion then proceeded to Nightingale Jr High. After graduating from Nightingale, the youngsters would continue their education at Lincoln High School at the east end of North Broadway.

Hidden at the south end of Lamar St is the San Antonio Winery. In 1917 Santo Cambianica left his home in Italy and settled in Clover Heights to open up the winery. While many wineries went bankrupt during Prohibition, he cleverly survived by making sacramental wines for the Catholic Church. His family still makes wines for the church today as well as wines for the general public. It is one of the last wineries in Los Angeles and has been declared a cultural historical monument. Today, most of the old houses on Clover St have been demolished. The land was converted to parking lots for the Piggy Back trailers of the Union Pacific railroad that bought out the Espee. Later, this land was sold to The United Parcel Service, which built a distribution center for their growing delivery service. The Golden State Freeway now borders the east side of the community.

The old Clover Street birth grounds became increasingly an industrial hub, which even to this day still has turn-of-the-century workers' cottages near Main Street just blocks away from the Southern Pacific rail yards. The railroad was built by immigrants who were mostly Chinese and Mexicans who laid railroad tracks over the High Sierras and Rocky Mountains into the plains of the Midwest; And in some cases they tenaciously bored tunnels through the mountains to lay their railroad tracks. Along the Clover Barrio, there were machine shops and rail yards to support the railroad. These facilities maintained and managed the distribution of locomotives, box cars, and cabooses. They were constantly serviced, taken apart and put back together to keep them running. The Southern Pacific Taylor yards and shops were located at the south end of Clover Street. It attracted many workers in the local area that consisted of machinists, apprentices, their helpers, and laborers. It was a convenient area to live. In the morning many of the workers in their overalls would walk from their nearby homes to the shop swinging their lunchboxes in rhythm with their stride. At 7AM the Espee (Southern Pacific) whistle could be heard throughout the neighborhood signaling the start of the work day. On the weekends with a 15-cent token one could take the streetcar downtown to go to the movies at the big theaters, or take in a live show at the Million Dollar Theater. Otherwise, one could just walk to the Starland Theater on Broadway a few blocks away or to the San Carlos Theater east of Daly Street on Main. On Sunday, after going to Mass at Our Lady Help of Christians, many would take the streetcar east to Lincoln Park. They would get their thrills on the various rides of the amusement park, try to catch the gold ring on the merry-go-round, or just go fishing at the lake.

The lake was originally named Eastlake, but the name was also changed in 1917 to Lincoln Park, reflecting on the new official name for the community; And Eastlake Park Avenue was also changed to Lincoln Park Avenue. This grand street was the "red carpet" leading to the main entrance to the park in its day. A hundred years ago Lincoln Park was the city limit and people crossed bridges by foot, horse, trolley, etc. over the LA river down N. Broadway and turned south on Eastlake Park Avenue. In 1913 William N. Selig purchased 32 acres of land next to Eastlake Park at a reported cost of $1 million. The property was turned into a zoo for the animals that he used in his films. By 1915, 700 animal species were residing at the Selig Zoo. The Selig Zoo is gone, but Lincoln Park and the Lake remain. And so does the San Antonio winery at its original location. The San Antonio Winery, continues to operate today, albeit with non-local grapes, and Lincoln Park is now used to celebrate Chicano culture and Mexican heritage. Cinco de Mayo at the park, is now an event that brings Raza from all over, down to The Heights!

Like most other inner city LA neighborhoods, the 1970's and 1980's saw the rise of "white flight" and "brown flight" too, as established Raza moved onto the growing and more prosperous suburbs of Los Angeles. In a City of Angels that often disdains the old for the new, Clover Heights is a tough old neighborhood where 26% of the residents live below the poverty line and timeworn attitude hangs in the balance... History yet to be completed, pending further revision.

22 comments:

Lonewolf said...

Varrio CLOVER has its roots going back to the 1920s.. It is mentioned in several newspapers articles and it is quoted in books concerning LA's Mexican history, including making mention of CLOVER as a Varrio (gang).. It's roots as a warring "gang" goes back to the feuds with others like Hazard and Dog Town even as far back as the 1920s.. Clover is documented to be a very active participant in the 1940s Happy Valley Wars which 7 of those warring Varrios are said to have signed a peace treaty (signed a truce).. Those signatory Varrios mentioned are CLOVER, DOG TOWN, HAZARD, HAPPY VALLEY, ROSE HILLS, LA LOMA, and ALPINE.. CLOVER is also amongst the noted Varrios to have participated and taken action in the Zoot-Suit Riots of 1943.. CLOVER is listed alongside those other near-by Varrios like FROG TOWN, AVENUES, MACY, DOG TOWN, ALPINE, FIRST STREET, HAPPY VALLEY and The FLATS.. The DUENDES (LEPRECHAUNS) are claimed to be their original clique, and the JOKERS clique is said to have started in the late 1950s and ruled through the 1960s until their TINY JOKERS clique took over in the 1970s.. CALLE SICHEL LOCOS began in the very late 1970s as an independent, but early on in the 1980s it became incorporated into E'S'CLOVER proper...

Anonymous said...

I grew up on Clover Street in the fities. Looking for pictures of the old street. It's home to me. Too bad it's gone. It was a great place to grow up. It was a small world all it's own where a child could experience everything a child should and became street-wise in a positive way. I went to Our Lady Help of Christians and have very fond memories of growing up there.

Robert said...

"CALLE SICHEL LOCOS"

Anonymous said...

fuck all these fake hoods some of this history here aint even true clover started in 1907 boyle heights and lincoln heights didnt even exist highland park all those areas it was all east la downtown la central it was clover against the italians back then and there was irish immagrant's and mexicans in clover houses once surrounded the eastside brewary where clover was known to keep the american sailors and white racist out of rapeing and assaulting monorities there was not really a gang on gang war back then it was more like a racial cleasing in east la respect 4 the clover streets which was all lincoln heights some of boyle heights all valley all mission even to elsereno on locke street lincoln park was east la park a click of clovers the original gang to put east los on the map in the 213 area downtown la central los angeles on news papers dating back to 1910 where it was a racial war clover back then considered a mafia type club notoriously labled.

Anonymous said...

East side clover was my tio's neighborhood. BIG EPA from Clover, he was Clover! My other tio was Raton from Clover. I remember when my grandmother lived in El Sereno (Barstow) which was Sereno, but my uncles the LOZANO"S ran that street back in the 70's. Rest in peace uncle David and I love you Angel. I believe my uncles were form the 28th street clique. Son Epa y los Mongols!

Anonymous said...

David EPA was a good vato but he was not clover...

As for Raton, theres different things going around about him and his bible...ANYWAY

FUCK THE MONGOLS!!!

PURO SUR TRECE

Anonymous said...

I grew up and lived in the heights for 40 yrs!.. and I'm thankful I didn't get caught up in the ganglife...but much respect to the o.g. homies!

Anonymous said...

free BAMBAM ... esclover 19st

MICLO GUNNZ* LIL GHOST said...

EAST SIDE CLOVER#1. WE R THEM SICK ASS FUCKEN LEPS, THAT HAVE LEVAS HIDING IN HILLS LIKE FUCKEN LAMES. THEY CALL ME LIL GHOST AKA MICLO-GUNNZ FROM THAT CLICK THAT LAUGHS NOW & SMILES LATER ... TINY JOKERS. WE DONT PAY RENT CUZ WE PUNK U TAGGING ASS LAMES 4M ....LIL..HYNAS..THROWING..SNITCH... & CHEESERS.. (FORMER CLICKS OF CLOVER mind you) IN 2 PAYING!""!!!! FOR U FUCKEN PUSSIOCHEROS aka DICK..EATING..FAGGOTS ... THIS.. HIGH*ROLLING*KILLA IS COMUNG 4 U NEXT ... LET FAGGY SEKO..MEKOS ROTT IN PISS LIKE BITCH ASS LEVAS LIL D & CLEVER......
THIS IS SICK LEPRECHAUN MR* MICS* GUNNZ.. TJKS V.E•S•CLOVER#1 19ST.28ST. 34ST. CHICOS*LOCOS. JOKERS. JOKERETTES. SICHEL ST LOCOS. CUT DOWNS .... HASTA LA VICTORIA SIEMPRE

Anonymous said...

I Love You Mom, You are missed ... Giggles ESC
Your Princess

Anonymous said...

I knew your mom. Great home girl. RIP.

Anonymous said...

I knew EPA and raton or priest. But you are right epa was not clover.

Anonymous said...

I lived on 28th street believe me those streets were never by one person or family. Ration was from sichel then tiny jokers n he never rode for the hood just his mouth.

WICKED LEP19 said...

TO ALL MY LEPRECHAUNS THIS IS "W" STOP ALL THE INTERNET BANGING AND GET OUT THERE AND DO WHAT U NEED TO DO. REMEMBER EVERYTHING THAT WE HAVE DONE AND ALL THE HOMIES THAT WE HAVE LOST, LOST THEYRE LIVES FOR YOU SO YOU CAN WALK AROUND WITH UR HEAD HELD UP HIGH. BE PROUD OF WHERE WE'RE FROM AND IF U CAN'T HANDLE IT GET THE FUCK OUT OF MY LAND.


REMEMBER
WICKED ESE19

Anonymous said...

♧Vallejo st. Rip joseph ♧

Anonymous said...

The big homie cholo from esclover 19st


Anonymous said...

EPA was and always will be my dad DAVID Lozano and I do and wish he was here on this earth I don't care where my dad was from but he died in Lincoln heights in 1993 may 1 anyone knows him or have pics or even stories about him I would love to hear them plz, I don't know how my dad died I was a child but I'm his age when he died now. I only have 2 pics of him thanks Veronica

Anonymous said...

What's up with the homie Villen

Anonymous said...

Looking for Jaime Gomez aka Picos, my son is 40 and never met him, he's also looking for half brother and sisters you will find me on facebook..... Anna Muniz from Kingsville, TX

Anonymous said...

I'm looking for someone that was in Clover back in the 70s his name's Jaime Gomez aka Picos I remember him Jacobs four leaf clover on his upper arm anyway my name is Anna Muniz you can find me on Facebook its a long story but I dated him back when I lived in East Los moved to Texas and was pregnant my son is now 40 and has been looming for his father... I'm thankfull for any info.

Anonymous said...

Grew up on 28st. Next door to us lived Pilo from Clover. And then just found out that jr. Sanchez who lived in the apts. Where i lived next to Pilos house got killed . i think jr. Was frpm the heights. Pilos house if i remember got demolishef and is now apts. Pilo had a sister named manda and she had a son named andy and two daughters one named Rene y la otra Angela.

MR. VEGA said...

What about Clover 34 ...